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Living and working spaces have the ability to affect our mental health and productivity levels. Take a few minutes and return items to their proper place each day after every use. If possible, leave the more time-consuming chores for school-free days.

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Organizing closets is a great opportunity to take stock of how much stuff you own versus what you really use. Pull all the items out of your bedroom closet, and sort them into like categories. Then, get out similar items stashed under beds or in a spare-bedroom closet. Once you have items in a single place, it’s hard to ignore excess and duplication.

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The kitchen can be one of the easiest places to organize. Start by going through the food in your pantry. Box up unwanted items that haven’t been opened and aren’t expired, and take them to your local food shelf. Next, go through your tableware, pots and pans and decorative kitchen accessories. Donate anything you aren’t using regularly or don’t love. Giving makes the letting go a lot easier.

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If you’re looking for a cheap way to recreate a sunburst mirror, this Dollar Tree hacks video from DIY creator @jaymuneediy takes you through the simple tutorial using just five items.

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The next best thing to a video message from your favorite celebrity? How about treating yourself to a previously owned celebrity item on eBay — even those who have passed on? Currently, you can purchase a bra allegedly worn by Scarlett Johansson, a French English Dictionary owned and signed by Hedy Lamarr or a gold check from Evel Knievel’s personal bank account. Just make sure to do your due diligence to authenticate items prior to purchase.

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The best thing about scavenger hunts is that they can be held anywhere. Whether it’s in your backyard or local park, scavenger hunts offer kids the opportunity to find a list of items while interacting with nature along the way. This book offers different ideas for hunts and includes a leveled difficulty rating so families can choose the scavenger hunt that best fits the age group of the children. Each hunt also comes with facts about the items on the list.

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If your home could use some decluttering, now’s a good time to involve your kids in the process. Focus on one room, or one area of a room, at a time. Designate separate bags or boxes for items you can give away, recycle or throw away. Depending on how old your kids are, you can set limits for the number of toys, clothes or other items they can keep. When you’re finished, check whether any local charitable organizations are accepting donations. If there’s nowhere to take them now, stow them in the garage or storage room until operations resume in your area.

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Indoor fetch works best in a long hallway or on stairs. It’s safer on carpeting or another grippy surface so your dog does not slip or slide. Make sure to clear away fragile or dangerous items first. Then, find a ball and toss it.

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From Denver's first scrimmage play resulting in a safety on a bad snap, the only noteworthy item was the first outdoor Super Bowl in a cold-weather city. And it was mild for early February, then snowed the next day.

Hunters in North Dakota are being reminded that tree stands, blinds, steps and other personal items such as cameras must be removed from all w…

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TSA gives pumpkin pie the green light. You can pack it as a carry-on or in checked luggage. In case your flight is delayed, keep a fork handy. Travelers who still have questions about food items can check out TSA’s “What can I bring?” web page that lists what items are allowed or not in your carry-on.

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These are highlights from goop's curated "Ridiculous But Awesome" gift guide, so at least there's a little self awareness about the excessiveness of most of these items. The site even prefaces the list by stating "Be honest: This is why you’re here in the first place."

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While you don't need to automatically throw away an accidentally frozen canned good, the USDA recommends taking some precautions before eating the item in question. If the can appears swollen, try thawing it in the refrigerator before opening it. This applies only if you're absolutely sure the swelling is because of the cold. If the can swells for other reasons, toss it. If everything — color, texture, smell — appears normal, you're probably in the clear. If anything seems off, get rid of it. And if the seams on the can appear to have rusted or burst, don't risk it.

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