Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Government Regulations

  • Updated

The Missouri Legislature has passed $40 million in annual tax breaks for farmers. The GOP-led Senate on Tuesday voted 26-3 to send the tax incentive package to Gov. Mike Parson. Lawmakers had passed a similar bill in May. But the Republican governor vetoed it, in part citing the short two-year sunset on many of the tax credits. He called a special legislative session to extend the agricultural tax credits for a longer period of time. He also asked lawmakers to spend some of the state's surplus revenue on an individual income tax cut, which they approved last week.

  • Updated

In Georgia’s pivotal U.S. Senate race, Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and his Republican challenger, Herschel Walker, have sought to cast the other as an abortion extremist. At the same time, they deflect questions about the details of their own positions on the issue. The sidestepping reflects the sensitivity of abortion politics in a post-Roe v. Wade America, where the procedure is open to regulation by state governments and, potentially, by Congress. But Walker’s strategy may not work much longer after The Daily Beast reported Monday that he paid for a girlfriend’s 2009 abortion — a blatant contradiction of his claims that there’s “no excuse” for a procedure he characterizes as “killing.” Walker called the report a lie.

  • Updated

Amazon has sued Washington state’s labor agency following disputes with regulators over citations and fines imposed on the company for worker safety issues. In the lawsuit, filed Monday in federal court for the Western District of Washington, Amazon asked a judge to prohibit orders from the state agency to remedy any types of workplace hazards during its appeal over the citations. Amazon argued the agency has not proven any of its allegations. It says requiring companies like it to remedy alleged hazards before that happens violates the due process protections under the 14th Amendment. A spokesperson for the agency says they will review the lawsuit.

  • Updated

Elon Musk is offering to go through with his original proposal to buy Twitter for $44 billion. The Tesla CEO said in a regulatory filing Tuesday that he notified Twitter of plans to go through with the deal. A trial seeking to compel Musk to buy the social media platform is set to start in Delaware Chancery Court in less than two weeks. Trading in Twitter’s stock had been halted for much of the day pending release of the news,. It resumed trading late Tuesday and soared almost 22% to $51.80.

  • Updated

Supporters of abortion rights are suing to keep an old Arizona law that criminalizes nearly all abortions from being enforced. They argue in the lawsuit filed Tuesday that laws passed by the state Legislature after 1973′s Roe v. Wade decision should take precedence and abortions should be allowed until 15 weeks into a pregnancy. The 15-week law was passed this year and took effect a day after a Tucson judge said a pre-statehood law banning all abortions can be enforced. The lawsuit filed by a Phoenix abortion doctor and the Arizona Medical Association repeats many of the arguments made by abortion rights groups in their failed effort to get a judge to continue a 50-year-old injunction against enforcing the pre-statehood law.

  • Updated

A conservative Wisconsin law firm is suing to stop federal student loan forgiveness, saying President Joe Biden’s loan forgiveness plan is discriminatory and amounts to taxation without representation. The Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty filed a lawsuit in federal court Tuesday asking a judge to issue an order immediately halting student loan forgiveness until the lawsuit plays out. The lawsuit argues that Biden had no authority to forgive student loans and improperly bypassed Congress to enact his plan. It also says that Biden's plan is discriminatory because it's designed in part to help Black borrowers.

  • Updated

The snail darter, a tiny Southeastern fish at the center of an epic battle over Endangered Species Act protection in the 1970s, is no longer considered imperiled. The snail darter held up construction of the Tellico Dam in Tennessee for more than two years as biologists and others fought to protect its only known habitat, the free-flowing Little Tennessee River. The battle is still sometimes cited as an example of environmental excess, although the reality is much more complicated. The U.S. Department of the Interior announced on Tuesday the snail darter’s official removal from the federal list of threatened and endangered wildlife. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland calls the fish’s recovery “a remarkable conservation milestone.”

  • Updated

A judge has barred the enforcement of an executive order signed by Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney last week banning guns and deadly weapons from the city’s indoor and outdoor recreation spaces, including parks, basketball courts and pools. The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that Common Pleas Judge Joshua Roberts on Monday ordered Philadelphia “permanently enjoined” from enforcing the order. The Gun Owners of America, on behalf of several state residents, filed a lawsuit immediately after Kenny’s order, which was the latest attempt by Philadelphia officials to regulate guns inside city limits despite a state law barring any city or county from passing gun-control measures.

  • Updated

A Phoenix abortion clinic has developed a way for patients who can end their pregnancy using a pill to get the medication quickly without running afoul of a resurrected Arizona law that bans most abortions. Under the arrangement that began Monday, patients at Camelback Family Planning will have an ultrasound in Phoenix, get a prescription through a telehealth appointment with a California doctor and then have it mailed to a post office in a California border town for pickup. The costs will be picked up by the Abortion Fund of Arizona.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court has rejected Oakland’s last-ditch effort to revive an antitrust lawsuit against the National Football League over the Raiders’ move to Las Vegas in 2020. The city had been seeking hundreds of millions of dollars in its claim that the league violated federal antitrust law by acting like a “cartel” that sent the Raiders away when Oakland refused to meet the NFL’s “increasingly exorbitant” demand for public money to build a new stadium. The federal appeals court in San Francisco rejected the lawsuit, and the justices said Monday they would not intervene.

  • Updated

A New York state task force created after a 2018 limo crash has issued a safety report with recommendations including equipping the vehicles with side impact protection devices and taking them off the roads after a certain number of miles. In October 2018, a Ford Excursion SUV which had been turned into a stretch limo crashed in Schoharie, New York, after blowing through a T-intersection. The driver and 17 people inside the vehicle were killed, along with two pedestrians. It was the deadliest U.S. transportation accident in nearly a decade, pushing lawmakers to pass a package of limo safety legislation.

  • Updated

The long list of celebrities promoting cryptocurrencies just got shorter. Kim Kardashian is being barred from doing so for three years — and will pay a $1 million fine — to settle federal charges that she recommended a crypto security to her 330 million Instagram followers without making clear that she was paid to do so. The reality TV star also must give up the $250,000 she was paid for the Instagram post about Ethereum Max tokens, plus interest. That's according to a Securities and Exchange Commission settlement announced Monday. Kardashian is the latest celebrity to get ensnared in regulations that require full disclosure by people getting paid to promote financial products.

  • Updated

Missouri lawmakers are close to passing a $40 million package of tax breaks for farmers and other agricultural businesses. The Senate Appropriations Committee on Monday voted for the tax credits. The bill now heads to the full Senate for final approval. The bill is expected to come up for a final vote Tuesday. The bill extends several agricultural tax credits that have expired and creates new ones for biodiesel and fuel mixed with ethanol. It also expands government loan help for farmers.

  • Updated

Virginia's Republican Gov. Glenn Youngkin is calling for expanding nuclear power generation in the state, and reevaluating a recent clean energy law celebrated by environmentalists. His administration laid out those and other goals in a 29-page state energy plan unveiled Monday. The plan also calls for restoring greater authority to state regulators who oversee the state’s powerful utilities. The energy plan carries no force but offers insight on policy choices Youngkin’s administration may pursue. Environmental groups and some Democratic state lawmakers were broadly critical of Youngkin’s plan. They vowed Monday to push back on any attempt to roll back environmental reforms enacted in recent years.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court began its new term Monday with a new justice on the bench, the public back in the courtroom and a spirited debate in a case that pits environmental protections against property rights. The new member of the court, Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, wasted no time joining the lively give-and-take, asking questions throughout nearly two hours of arguments in the dispute over the nation’s main anti-water pollution law, the Clean Water Act. Jackson, appointed by President Joe Biden, seemed to be generally aligned with the court’s other two liberal justices in favor of Justice Department arguments to preserve the authority of the federal government to regulate wetlands under the Clean Water Act against a business-backed challenge.

  • Updated

Twitter wants a Delaware court to order Elon Musk to buy the social media service for $44 billion, as he promised back in April. But suppose a judge makes that ruling and Musk balks? The Tesla billionaire's reputation for dismissing government pronouncements has some worried about how he’d react to an unfavorable ruling of the Delaware Court of Chancery, known for its handling of high-profile business disputes. But the likelihood of him losing badly — such as by an order of “specific performance” that forces him to complete the deal — has raised concerns about how the Delaware court would, or could, enforce its final ruling.

  • Updated

UnitedHealth Group says it has completed its acquisition of Change Healthcare, closing the roughly $8 billion deal a couple weeks after a judge rejected a challenge from regulators. UnitedHealth is merging the technology company with its Optum segment. The health care giant said the combination will simplify clinical, administrative and payment processes for care providers and bill payers. The Justice Department had sued to block the deal. Regulators argued it would put too much information about health care claims in the hands of one company. But U.S. District Judge Carl Nichols issued an order last month denying the government’s request.

  • Updated

Philadelphia 76ers coach Doc Rivers took his players to Charleston, South Carolina, as a team bonding experience. He also wanted to use it as an educational tool. Rivers and the Sixers organized field trips to the Old Slave Mart Museum, often staffed by individuals who trace their history to the enslaved people of Charleston, and to the Avery Institute of Afro-American History and Culture. Citadel President Gen. Glenn Walters and retired professor and historian Bernard Powers both spoke to the team. Rivers has become an agent of change in the NBA and found his voice as an activist.

  • Updated

An investigation by The Associated Press and the PBS series “Frontline” has documented a sophisticated Russian-run smuggling operation that has used falsified manifests and seaborne subterfuge to steal Ukrainian grain worth at least $530 million. The AP and “Frontline” used satellite imagery and marine radio transponder data to track three dozen ships making more than 50 voyages carrying grain from Russian-occupied areas of Ukraine to ports in the Middle East. The ongoing theft is being carried out by wealthy businessmen and state-owned companies in Russia and Syria. Some of them already face financial sanctions from the United States and European Union. Legal experts say the theft is a potential war crime.

  • Updated

The lights are out at a coal-fired power plant in northwestern New Mexico that has provided electricity to millions of people across the southwestern U.S. for nearly a half-century. The closure of the San Juan Generating Station follows years of legal battles by environmentalists and mounting regulatory pressures aimed at curbing pollution and climate change. The realities of closing the plant and the adjacent mine are now setting in for surrounding communities, many of which are home to Native Americans. Hundreds of good-paying jobs are evaporating along with tens of millions of dollars in annual tax revenue that's used to fund local schools.

  • Updated

U.S. officials celebrated at the start of September when top allies agreed to back an audacious, never-before-tried plan to clamp down on Vladimir Putin’s access to cash. The countries would pay only cut-rate prices for Russian oil. That would deprive Putin of money to keep prosecuting his war in Ukraine, but also ensure that oil kept gushing out of Russia and kept global prices low. But nearly a month later, the organization made up of some of the world’s leading economies, the Group of Seven, is still figuring out how to execute their plan and gather participants.

  • Updated

A new regulation coming into force in Poland that requires pregnancy information to be uploaded to the national digital system has women's organizations concerned that it will be another way for the conservative government to control women's lives. The Health Ministry regulation takes effect Saturday, with women's groups suggesting that authorities may monitor pregnancies as another means of control in the country with a very strict anti-abortion law. The ministry had denied this, saying the information will help doctors treat patients by providing them with vital information. Abortion is allowed in Poland only if pregnancy threatens the woman's health or results from crime.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court opens its new term on Monday and will hear arguments for the first time after a summer break and with new Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson among its nine members. The court already has said it will decide cases on a range of big issues, including affirmative action, voting rights and the rights of LGBTQ people. The justices will add more cases to their docket in the coming months. In cases from Harvard University and the University of North Carolina, the court could end any consideration of race in college admissions. And the court could further reduce protections for minority voters in another major consideration of the landmark Voting Rights Act.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court begins a new term on Monday at a time of diminished public confidence and justices sparring openly over the institution’s legitimacy. The court seems poised to push American law to the right on issues of race, voting and the environment. Back in June, the conservative majority overturned nearly 50 years of constitutional protections for abortion rights. Now, the court is diving back in with an aggressive agenda that appears likely to split the six conservative justices from the three liberals. Joining the nine-member court is new Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, the court’s first Black woman.

  • Updated

The U.S. government will soon spend $25 million to help patients access experimental drugs for the incurable illness known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The new strategy blurs the line between research and treatment. And it breaks decades of precedent in which responsibility for funding so-called compassionate use fell to drugmakers. But after years of being rebuffed by drugmakers, ALS patients lobbied Congress to help fund access to not-yet-approved drugs. While it offers a critical new treatment option for ALS patients, it also raises the possibility that federal dollars could be tapped for unproven treatments of other diseases in the future.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News