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The owner of the sole abortion clinic in North Dakota has been busy getting a new location ready in Moorhead, Minnesota. Tammi Kromenaker was directing traffic Friday outside a commercial building she bought just a few miles away from her current location in Fargo. Kromenaker has a lawsuit pending that seeks to block North Dakota's abortion ban on the grounds that it's contrary to the state constitution. She'll have to shut down later this month unless a judge intervenes. Kromenaker hasn't said when the new location will open but has said patients won't see any interruption in service.

The owner of the sole abortion clinic in North Dakota has been busy getting a new location ready in Moorhead, Minnesota. Tammi Kromenaker was directing traffic Friday outside a commercial building she bought just a few miles away from her current location in Fargo. Kromenaker has a lawsuit pending that seeks to block North Dakota's abortion ban on the grounds that it's contrary to the state constitution. She'll have to shut down later this month unless a judge intervenes. Kromenaker hasn't said when the new location will open but has said patients won't see any interruption in service.

The owner and operator of North Dakota’s lone abortion clinic says a judge’s ruling that will delay the closing of the state's lone abortion clinic should provide more than enough time for her to move it a few miles away to Minnesota. Red River Women’s Clinic director Tammi Kromenaker said Thursday that she was prepared to reopen her Fargo clinic in neighboring Moorhead, Minnesota, next week if the state’s abortion ban had taken effect Thursday. She says now, she'll have more time to ensure everything goes smoothly when she reopens in Moorhead, likely within the next month. Minnesota has become an island of legal abortion in the Upper Midwest.

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North Dakota’s only abortion clinic is preparing for what could be its final day of performing procedures. The Red River Women's Clinic in Fargo will offer abortion care on Wednesday, and on Thursday a trigger ban is set to make abortion illegal in the state. Barring a judge's intervention, it likely means an indefinite period when patients will be forced to travel hundreds of miles to receive care until the clinic can open in a new location just across the river in Moorhead, Minnesota, where abortion remains legal. Clinic director Tammi Kromenaker has not said when the facility will be ready and did not respond to messages Tuesday.

To solve the problem of abortion access, Meg Autry is seeking inspiration from an unlikely source: riverboat casinos.

The North Dakota attorney general's office says a motion seeking to block enforcement of a so-called trigger law that would shut down the state's lone abortion clinic should be denied. The state says the law was administered property by Attorney General Drew Wrigley. He certified a July 28 closing date shortly after a U.S. Supreme Court opinion overturned Roe v. Wade. The clinic says Wrigley was premature in starting the 30-day countdown and should have waited for the official judgment. The state says Wrigley met the only condition to shutting down the clinic, which was whether the high court's ruling was clear. The motion is part of a lawsuit on the constitutionality of the ban. The clinic serves patients from the Dakotas and Minnesota.

The North Dakota attorney general's office says a motion seeking to block enforcement of a so-called trigger law that would shut down the state's lone abortion clinic should be denied. The state says the law was administered property by Attorney General Drew Wrigley. He certified a July 28 closing date shortly after a U.S. Supreme Court opinion overturned Roe v. Wade. The clinic says Wrigley was premature in starting the 30-day countdown and should have waited for the official judgment. The state says Wrigley met the only condition to shutting down the clinic, which was whether the high court's ruling was clear. The motion is part of a lawsuit on the constitutionality of the ban. The clinic serves patients from the Dakotas and Minnesota.

A court ruling that struck down most of Minnesota’s restrictions on abortion as unconstitutional will speed the process for clinics and patients. But providers are still studying all the implications of how the landscape will change as a result. Two key points of Monday’s ruling are expected to have the most immediate impacts: the end of Minnesota’s mandatory 24-hour waiting period, and a requirement that both parents be notified before a minor can get an abortion. The end a rule that only physicians can perform abortions is expected to further ease access over time as other clinicians become trained.

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