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The 4th Congressional District in Washington state is a land of snow-capped volcanic peaks and lush irrigated apple orchards. It’s also home to one of the few Republicans who voted to impeach former President Donald Trump and then won his next election. U.S. Rep. Dan Newhouse was one of 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump last year, and is one of only two to beat back GOP challengers this year. Newhouse was the leading vote-getter in the race for his seat in the Aug. 2 Washington primary election, despite withering criticism from Trump and a Trump-backed challenger.  U.S. Rep. David Valadao, R-Calif. - who like Newhouse ran in a top-two open primary - also prevailed two months ago.

Dear Annie: Nearly 20 years ago, after a tumultuous breakup, I met and married my current wife. I cared for her, but I did not love her as one…

Dear Annie: I am a widow who lives alone. I have three children, a son and two daughters. They are grown, married and have their own children.…

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A Georgia dairy farm has been fined after a release of food waste caused a fish kill. It's a rare instance of government getting involved with a practice that counties can’t regulate despite chronic complaints from residents. The Georgia Environmental Protection Division fined McAvoy Farms, also known as Mar Leta Farms, $5,000 after nearly 1,700 fish died in the Little River in Wilkes County on June 16. The state found that 1.2 million gallons of sludge and other food byproducts overflowed a lagoon and into a creek over a six-week period. Farmers accept the byproducts as what’s called a soil amendment, which can be used in place of traditional fertilizer. Critics call it industrial waste.

Money from the sale of Florida beachfront property where a collapsed condominium tower once stood will be used to pay property taxes of the destroyed units, a judge has ordered.

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The birds no longer sing. The cows die. And if the people in this northern Myanmar forest complain, they too face the threat of death from militias. This forest is the source of key metallic elements known as rare earths, often called the vitamins of the modern world. Rare earths turn up in everything from hard drives to elevators, and are vital to the fast-growing field of green energy. But an AP investigation found their cost is environmental destruction, the theft of land and the funneling of money to brutal militias. The AP tied rare earths from Myanmar to the supply chains of 78 companies. Nearly all who responded said they took environmental protection and human rights seriously.

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The birds no longer sing. The cows die. And if the people in this northern Myanmar forest complain, they too face the threat of death from militias. This forest is the source of key metallic elements known as rare earths, often called the vitamins of the modern world. Rare earths turn up in everything from hard drives to elevators, and are vital to the fast-growing field of green energy. But an AP investigation found their cost is environmental destruction, the theft of land and the funneling of money to brutal militias. The AP tied rare earths from Myanmar to the supply chains of 78 companies. Nearly all who responded said they took environmental protection and human rights seriously.

Dear Annie: Perhaps you can help me understand the biggest mystery of my life. I was an unwanted, unloved child -- a third girl with a brother…

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The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers are central arms of California's water system. But they are becoming too salty to use for some farmers and cities that rely on them as the state's punishing drought drags on. In dry times, less fresh water flows from the mountains through California's rivers and into an estuary known as the Delta. That means saltier water from the Pacific Ocean is able to push further into the system, which supplies water to millions of people and acres of farmland. The Delta's challenges foreshadow the risks to come for key water supplies from drought and sea level rise made worse by climate change.

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Authorities say a buffalo charged and seriously injured a Kansas sheriff’s deputy one day before the animal’s owner was found gored to death. Ellsworth County Sheriff Murray Marston said in a news release that the buffalo had wandered onto a state highway and the deputy was trying to get the animal back in a pasture when it charged. A deputy from a neighboring county “put down" the animal. Then, Monday morning, dispatchers got a call from a woman who said that she had found her nephew, 56-year-old Scott Schroeder, of rural Bushton, dead in a pen and that she thought a buffalo had killed him.

Dear Annie: I thought I would share some fantastic advice my husband and I received from a marriage counselor a few years ago during a very di…

Dear Annie: I recently read your column in which you gave advice on how to deal with a toxic relationship between a mother and adult daughter.…

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Vermont Lt. Gov. Molly Gray and Senate President Pro Tempore Becca Balint are the leading candidates in a Democratic U.S. House primary that could make either of them the first female member of the state's congressional delegation. Gray has the backing of the centrist lane of the party, with endorsements from two former governors and a campaign donation from retiring U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy. Balint has been endorsed by an all-star list of progressive leaders, including the state’s other U.S. senator, Bernie Sanders, and the founders of Vermont’s famously progressive ice cream company, Ben & Jerry’s. The winner of Tuesday’s primary is expected to cruise to victory in November in deep-blue Vermont.

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Three more ships carrying thousands of tons of corn have left Ukrainian ports. The movement Friday is the latest sign that a negotiated deal to export grain trapped since Russia invaded Ukraine nearly six months ago is slowly moving forward. But major hurdles lie ahead to get food to the countries that need it most. While the shipments have raised hopes of easing a global food crisis, experts say much of the grain that Ukraine is trying to export is used for animal feed, not for people to eat. And the cargoes are not expected to have a significant impact on the global price of corn, wheat and soybeans.

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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has visited Russia for talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin. They discussed a grain deal brokered by Turkey and the U.N., prospects for talks on ending hostilities in Ukraine, the situation in Syria and growing economic ties between Moscow and Ankara. Last month, Turkey and the U.N. helped broker agreements between Russia and Ukraine for Ukraine to export 22 million tons of grain and other agricultural products that have been stuck in its Black Sea ports since Moscow sent troops into the country. In a statement issued after Friday's talks that lasted four hours, Putin and Erdogan emphasized “the necessity of a complete fulfillment of the package deal reached in Istanbul.”

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