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Custer Health

Custer Health nursing director Jodie Fetsch, left, shows items the Mandan Good Neighbor Project syringe exchange program provides to clients. In back are nurses Jennifer Pelster, left, and Rebecca Nielsen.

"I think a court looking at this right now would say they don't meet the exception and they need to divest."

-- Derrick Braaten, a Bismarck attorney, who represents the Dakota Resource Council in a court case that challenges the state's anti-corporate farming law, on Dakota Access LLC still owning about 7,000 acres of ranchland along the pipeline route in Morton County.

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"I think we're going to have to build trust. It's just going to take a while for them to get used to us treating them anonymously and not calling the police. They worry about the police coming."

-- Jodie Fetsch, director of nursing for Custer Health, on the first state syringe exchange program.

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"It just happened to be the chance that that fire crew was passing by at the time and noticed the fire. It allowed for a quick reaction, a quick response."

-- Bismarck Fire Marshal Owen Fitzsimmons, on how a fire crew noticed a fire at the Kelly Inn.

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"If we can get North Dakota natural gas liquids to these major market hubs, that could have a positive impact on North Dakota pricing."

-- Justin Kringstad, director of the North Dakota Pipeline Authority, on new pipelines planned for the state.

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"Living on the reservation, sometimes we get into this idea that we are powerless. From this last year, I learned that we have the power to change ourselves, we have the power to pray, we have the power to stand up. I truly believe if we continue to stand up in goodness and kindness and in prayer, we can do almost anything."

-- Standing Rock historian LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, during a march to mark the anniversary of the closing of the main Dakota Access Pipeline opposition camp.

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"We are failing our students if we don't change our teaching practices and education system that was created over 125 years ago. If we ask our students to try to learn to grow every day, shouldn't we be doing the same?"

-- Olivia Becker, a second-grade teacher at Rita Murphy Elementary School, asking the Bismarck School Board to consider a new, opt-in public elementary school that would provide an "experiential" option to students.

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"I think that, for me, especially in North Dakota, it's really an honor to use my platform, my voice, to sort of supply music for great cause."

-- Singer Kat Perkins, on why she’s doing a benefit concert on March 8 for The Welcome House.

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"If food alone was the answer to hunger, we would have solved it by now after 35 years. If we're going to end hunger, we now know we need to attack it from multiple fronts, going beyond our current work of meeting the immediate need for food."

-- Steve Sellent, CEO of Great Plains Food Bank, on a new initiative called Ending Hunger 2.0, which extends beyond distributing food to the needy and includes partnerships with communities and other industries.

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"Because we're dry coming in, that April, May and June precipitation is critical. We'll be in trouble if we don't get water."

-- Kevin Sedivec, rangeland specialist and director of the North Dakota State University Central Grasslands Research Extension Center, discussing dry conditions at the Farming and Ranching for the Bottom Line conference.

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"We know it takes money to win (an) initiated measure. We just don't have the funding right now."

-- Former Democratic state lawmaker Ed Gruchalla, on the decision not to pursue a ballot measure to raise North Dakota's oil tax.

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"Every time is a little different. Sometimes, I'm thinking a lot about it and, sometimes, I'm just like, ‘All right, let's just go sing it. I have a game to play.'"

-- Kennedy Harris, a Mandan High School junior and basketball player, who often sings the national anthem before games.

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