Subscribe for 33¢ / day
the-rider-e1495984315648

Brady Jandreau suffered a serious brain injury when he was bucked off a bronc at a professional rodeo in 2016 in Fargo. His story is the basis for the movie, "The Rider," in which Jandreau and members of his family star. Jandreau trains horses on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

Forum News Service

"I could probably go ride broncs now. I feel like that's what God put me here to do — be a horseman."

-- Brady Jandreau, who survived a severe brain injury after being thrown from a horse at a Fargo rodeo. He now stars in the film “The Rider.”

q     q     q

"It's good news, but one doesn't need to start ringing church bells."

-- Sen. Ray Holmberg, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, reacting to news that oil and gas tax revenues have exceeded expectations so far this budget cycle.

q     q     q

"I am the positive, proven public servant that has led this city with vision very successfully the past four years."

-- Bismarck Mayor Mike Seminary, during Monday’s mayoral debate.

q     q     q

"Frankly, it's not the job of taxpayers to be paying for every issue that comes up."

-- Mayoral candidate Steve Bakken, questioning the $10,000 the city contributed to the United Way for the emergency housing crisis last winter. Bakken said the money would have been better spent on a long-term plan.

q     q     q

"I feel the city should have done better. That issue could have been solved better than what it is today."

-- Mayoral candidate Isaac Afoakwa, suggesting that Bismarck could have done a better job of handling the homeless situation.

q     q     q

"The Little Free Pantries are meant to complement those programs that already exist, to help fill in the gaps by providing a 24/7 place where people who need it can get some food or some Band-Aids or a pair of gloves. They can access it as they need it."

-- Tony Spilde, explaining the Little Free Pantries program that provides food and other items to those in need.

q     q     q

"As soon as I tell them I'm Native, they ask a lot of questions and I get comments from teachers like, 'Wow, that kid never talks.' That means a lot to me, because I know they want to learn. I'm glad to be a part of that."

-- Travis Albers, a cultural responsive coordinator for Bismarck Public Schools, on the reaction he gets from Native American students.

q     q     q

"We call them the hidden homeless. Society's definition of homeless, you think of a man under a newspaper down by the river, you think of those kinds of things, not that that doesn't happen, but, for kids, they're hidden."

-- Sherrice Roness, coordinator for the Bismarck School District's Students in Transition Program, on homeless students.

q     q     q

"Ultimately what we'd want to see is that we see a decrease of incarceration, a decrease of that repeat entry to jails over and over and that we're connecting people to services. That will take time."

-- Pam Sagness, director of the state's Behavioral Health Division, on the expected results from the Free Through Recovery program.

q     q     q

"In terms of budget, this office is funded wholly through in-kind donations from nonprofit organizations. We're very fortunate in that regard ... As we identify priorities, we go forth and fundraise or seek out support to make those happen in unique and creative ways to move quickly to make a difference for North Dakota."

-- Jenny Olson, managing director of the Office of Recovery Reinvented, discussing the office’s budget.

0
0
0
0
0