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Long X Bridge

The Long X Bridge spans the Little Missouri River south of Watford City.

"We're trying to stand up for landowners. The more I learn from both the opponents and the supporters, I get more skeptical of what the bill may actually do."

-- Lobbyist Kayla Pulvermacher, on why the North Dakota Farmers Union opposes Senate Bill 2344, a complex energy measure dealing with pore space.

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"I just feel privileged to be chosen to get it. We just want to do it right."

-- Paul Silbernagel, a Linton-area rancher who was chosen to get a portion of the historic Long X Bridge. The bridge is being replaced by a new structure.

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“I'm most proud of our persistence. We have been incredibly detail-oriented and vigilant in our monitoring of what is actually happening in western North Dakota and particularly public lands. If there had not been an organization like Badlands Conservation Alliance, industry would have had freer rein than it even did and does, and the losses would have been even greater than they have been.”

-- Jan Swenson, who is retiring as Badlands Conservation Alliance executive director.

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"So far, what we're seeing is a spring thaw. At this point, other than the potential for an ice jam, which is always there, there isn't a specific concern."

-- Gary Stockert, Bismarck's emergency manager, commenting on the flood outlook.

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"We believe North Dakota stands to take the lead in the development of this crop (hemp) in our nation, although we still need investors to come to the table for the processing of both the plant fiber as well as the oil."

-- Sen. Janne Myrdal, R-Edinburg, predicting a bright future for hemp in the state after passage of House Bill 1349 that aligns the state and federal definitions of hemp and establishes a program to regulate production.

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"You've got one small business for about every 10 people, including children, and that's a real challenge, because you create jobs in such a decentralized way."

-- U.S. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, during a roundtable discussion in Bismarck.

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"This legislation supports freedom, fairness and local control. We trust retailers to decide when it's best to open or not open their businesses, and we trust families and consumers to determine how best to spend their time."

-- Gov. Doug Burgum, signing a bill that repeals the state’s blue law. It goes into effect in August.

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"All the gorillas were in the room. So we worked with that and came up with what we believe is a reasonable solution and where the brewers were on board, the distributors were on board."

-- Sen. Jerry Klein, R-Fessenden, on Senate Bill 2343, which seeks to expand some functions of breweries, such as pouring beer at special events, selling certain amounts of beer and transferring beer among entities.

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"If we have an opportunity to start picking off some low-hanging fruit on projects with the use of this funding, then great. But until it's in our hands, we can't use it as a budgeting tool."

-- Bismarck Mayor Steve Bakken, referring to House Bill 1066, recently signed by the governor, that adds new "buckets" to the state funds filled from oil tax revenue, to be distributed throughout North Dakota for city, county, township and airport infrastructure projects.

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"It usually takes up my weekends, takes up my afternoons, but I still find some time to figure out where to get my homework done. I couldn't do it if I didn't love it."

-- Century High School senior Carly Palmer, on her commitment to the CHS's girls swim and dive team, as well as the Bismarck Aquastorm Swim Team.

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