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010819-nws-Wind-Farm-2

Nearly 50 people in red T-shirts showed their opposition to a proposed Morton Township windfarm during a Burleigh County Commissioners meeting on Monday night.

“Through raising awareness, we're hoping to prevent further cases from occurring."

-- Rep. Ruth Buffalo, D-Fargo, on two bills she introduced that would require law enforcement training and data collection related to missing and murdered indigenous people.

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"I don't know how people can afford this. I don't know how any of you guys can sleep at night knowing you're going to do this to people."

-- John Gartner, who owns property in a south side Mandan special assessment district, objecting to the Mandan City Commission about the high cost of the assessments.

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"We think this is a very dark day for property rights in North Dakota. Essentially, we have a wind project here that is following the rules, it's following the ordinance and the land is zoned for this type of use. So, essentially, these landowners' property rights ... they only go as far as what their neighbors are willing to agree to."

-- Courtney Timmons, PNE's director of business development, after the Burleigh County Commission voted 4-1 Monday to deny special use permits in Morton Township for the proposed Burleigh-Emmons Wind Farm.

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"There is a place for property rights, but also when you adopt zoning and ordinances, it gives other property owners, even, somewhat equal rights. If you're doing something that affects your neighbor, you have a right. And that's why you adopt zoning and ordinances to help protect you."

-- Ray Ziegler, Burleigh County's building official, noting that both parties — landowners and adjacent landowners — have equal rights in the wind farm project.

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"(The mountain lion) was working his way kind of northeast of the location of where he was trapped, and we kind of kidded a little bit, 'It looks like he's headed for Bismarck.' Well, lo and behold, this is that lion."

-- Jeb Williams, wildlife division chief for the state Game and Fish Department, on a mountain lion wandering through Bismarck that was later shot.

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"As we hear the clarion call of the governor around workforce development, we know that (the university) can assist with that great effort."

-- University of Mary President Monsignor James Shea on why the school is using $2 million from Energy Transfer Partners on workforce development.

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"There's no silver bullet. In reality, neither arming school staff with guns, placing SROs in every building or any other silver bullet approach helps solve that underlying safety issue."

-- Aimee Copas, executive director of the North Dakota Council of Education Leaders, on a bill to allow school districts to devise safety plans and collect more in property taxes to fund them.

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"I think that people that don't go to church shouldn't have to wait till church is over to go shopping. I believe in God. I'm a Christian. But they need to have a choice, at least."

-- Deborah Cheek, who supports ending the state’s blue laws. Rep. Shannon Roers Jones, R-Fargo, is introducing House Bill 1097, which she said would allow businesses to be open on Sunday mornings.

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"I can come to work, I can get all my work done before the store opens and the customers come in, so the store is all nice and clean, and it's wonderful. All the shelves are stocked, and it's all ready for them."

-- Elizabeth Steiner, who has worked for Walmart for almost 13 years, on why she likes the blue law.

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"We need to all be singing from the same page of the hymnal here because this is a very serious issue."

-- Blake Crosby, executive director of the North Dakota League of Cities, voicing support for Senate Bill 2110, which would define cybersecurity in state law and give responsibility to the state Information Technology Department to "advise, oversee and regulate cybersecurity strategy" for state agencies and public entities such as higher education, cities, counties and school districts.

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"The concept is fairly simple: Use those earnings (Legacy Fund) to replace the income tax, reduce everybody's tax burden. That way everybody is sharing in the legacy."

-- Republican Rep. Craig Headland, who chairs the House Finance and Taxation Committee, on a bill he plans to eliminate the state income tax.

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"Who should decide whether I get killed in that vehicle or not? It should be me."

-- Clarence Bittner, of Bismarck, in testimony opposing a bill to tighten the state’s seat belt law.

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