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Memorial Congregational Church

The Memorial Congregational Church, Dec. 19, 1989.

This is Up and Down, where we give a brief thumbs up and thumbs down on the issues from the past week.

Up

Star Parker in an April 29 column discussed Rich Karlgaard’s new book, "Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement," about youth and learning. Karlgaard is the publisher of Forbes magazine. He’s a native of Bismarck and his father, Richard, was the longtime director of athletics for the Bismarck School District. The book is another successful step in Rich Karlgaard’s career and he continues to make Bismarck proud.

Down

It was a major loss for the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation when the Memorial Congregational Church was destroyed by a fire. The church, built in 1926, had to be moved from Elbowoods to near White Shield when the Elbowoods area was flooded in 1954 during construction of the Garrison Dam. The reservation lost a church that served several generations. It’s a part of history that can’t be replaced.

Up

The Legislature has approved $8.9 million to expand Bismarck State College’s Health Sciences program. The funds will be used for a new building on campus that will accommodate more students and have state-of-the-art technology and equipment. That means students won’t have to travel to downtown Bismarck to attend classes in a leased facility. The building will include a "virtual hospital" that will allow for collaboration among the health sciences departments and provide additional training opportunities. The demand for health care workers is expected to grow and the expansion of the BSC program will help meet the market needs.

Down

Another campus in Bismarck will be losing a program. United Tribes Technical College announced that the recent resignations of the practical nursing program administrator and three faculty members is forcing the school to close its nursing program. UTTC has offered an associate degree in practical nursing since 1987. Arrangements have been made to allow the eight students in the program to graduate this spring. It’s unfortunate the school is losing the program because there’s a need for nurses in the state.

Up

Another flag will be flying daily in front of North Dakota’s Capitol and it has special meaning to lot of people. The Legislature passed a bill requiring the POW/MIA flag to permanently fly at the Capitol. On Wednesday, the daily display of the flag was formally launched. There are 82,000 Americans still missing from World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, the Gulf wars and other recent conflicts. It was a simple act by the Legislature that’s greatly appreciated.

Down

What some called the “trespass bill” failed in the North Dakota House in the final days of the legislative session. The final bill presumed all private land as closed except for hunting, unless asked to leave or if the land were legally posted. The Tribune believes the impact of the bill was exaggerated. Someone living in a town or city doesn’t expect strangers to wander onto their property and rural residents should be able to have the same expectations.

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