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Midwest Economy: April state-by-state glance
AP

Midwest Economy: April state-by-state glance

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OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The Institute for Supply Management, formerly the Purchasing Management Association, began formally surveying its membership in 1931 to gauge business conditions.

The Creighton Economic Forecasting Group uses the same methodology as the national survey to consult supply managers and business leaders. Creighton University economics professor Ernie Goss oversees the report.

The overall index ranges between 0 and 100. Growth neutral is 50, and a figure greater than 50 indicates growth in that factor over the next three to six months. A figure below 50 indicates decline.

Here are the state-by-state results for April:

Arkansas: The overall index for Arkansas decreased to 73.9 from 75.0 in March. Components from the survey were: new orders at 80.6, production or sales at 77.1, delivery lead time at 84.8, inventories at 70.2, and employment at 56.9. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Arkansas manufacturing employment is higher by 900 jobs, or 0.6%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 2.6% higher,” Goss said.

Iowa: The state's overall index rose to 67.9 from March's 66.5. Components were: new orders at 79.7, production, or sales, at 76.1, delivery lead time at 80.9, employment at 54.6, and inventories at 59.9. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Iowa manufacturing employment is down 4,300 jobs, or 1.9%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 2.1% lower,” Goss said.

Kansas: The overall index climbed to 75.0 from March’s 67.3. Components were: new orders at 80.9, production or sales at 77.5, delivery lead time at 85.6, employment at 57.6, and inventories at 73.2. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Kansas manufacturing employment is down 12,400 jobs, or 7.3%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 1.1% higher,” Goss said.

Minnesota: The April index rocketed to 79.7 from 59.8 in March. Components were: new orders at 82.0, production or sales at 78.8, delivery lead time at 90.8, inventories at 86.1, and employment at 60.6. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Minnesota manufacturing employment is down 13,600 jobs, or 4.2%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 1.7% higher,” Goss said.

Missouri: The April index rose to 73.2 from 70.5 in March. Components were: new orders at 80.4, production or sales at 76.9, delivery lead time at 84.0, inventories at 68.2, and employment at 56.5. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Missouri manufacturing employment is down 6,800 jobs, or 2.5%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 0.7% higher,” Goss said.

Nebraska: The April climbed to 76.8 from 72.0 in March. Components of the index were: new orders at 81.3, production or sales at 78.0, delivery lead time at 87.7, inventories at 78.1, and employment at 58.7. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Nebraska manufacturing employment is lower by 100 jobs, or 0.1%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 1.0% higher,” Goss said.

North Dakota: The overall index jumped to 74.3 from 69.3 in March. Components were: new orders at 83.3, production or sales at 80.3, delivery lead time at 82.1, employment at 63.8, and inventories at 62.3. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, North Dakota manufacturing employment is down 1,200 jobs, or 4.5%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 3.7% higher,” Goss said.

Oklahoma: The Oklahoma index expanded to 70.9 from 63.0 in March. Components were: new orders at 79.8, production or sales at 76.3, delivery lead time at 81.6, inventories at 61.9, and employment at 55.0. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Oklahoma manufacturing employment is down 9,200 jobs, or 6.6%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 4.3% higher,” Goss said.

South Dakota: The state's overall index climbed to 74.9 from 69.4 in March. Components were: new orders at 80.8, production or sales at 77.4, delivery lead time at 72.9, inventories at 72.9, and employment at 57.5. “Compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, South Dakota manufacturing employment is down 1,100 jobs, or 2.5%, while average hourly manufacturing wages are 2.9% higher,” Goss said.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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