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Cramer’s Senate campaign announces Trump endorsement

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Rep. Cramer

Rep. Kevin Cramer answers questions from the Grand Forks Herald editorial board on Aug. 16, 2017. Cramer opted out of a Senate bid, instead seeking re-election to the House.

President Trump on Friday endorsed the bid Rep. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., is making for the U.S. Senate, Cramer said on Twitter, bringing an expected but notable boost of momentum to a race widely expected to capture the national spotlight.

Cramer was unable to immediately be reached for comment. His social media announcement called Friday a “big day” and said he was “deeply honored” by Trump’s backing.

Cramer and Trump made headlines together less than two months ago as Cramer at first declined to enter the race for Senate, instead preferring to seek re-election to the House. In a Jan. 11, 2017, interview, Cramer disclosed a recent Oval Office meeting in which the president promised his support for a Senate campaign.

Cramer ultimately reversed his decision on Feb. 16, choosing a likely matchup with incumbent Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D. The election is expected to be among the most nationally important this fall, potentially deciding control of the U.S. Senate, which Republicans hold with a razor-thin 51-49 seat majority.

The endorsement comes days after reports that Cramer was with his 35-year-old son, Isaac, after he had been hospitalized in grave condition this past weekend. His health has since improved, Cramer said on Facebook, though he also noted he will miss votes in Washington to stay with his son while he recovers.

Cramer’s office did not respond to a Friday request for comment on his son’s condition and Cramer’s upcoming schedule.

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