Report shows $480,000 in donations to cover Pence legal aid
AP

Report shows $480,000 in donations to cover Pence legal aid

  • Updated
{{featured_button_text}}
Report shows $480,000 in donations to cover Pence legal aid

Vice President Pence leaves the podium after speaking to the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service at their headquarters in Rockville, Md., Tuesday, June 30, 2020.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donors contributed nearly $480,000 last year to cover Vice President Mike Pence’s legal expenses from special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe of Russian meddling in the 2016 elections, according to Pence’s financial disclosure report.

The annual report, released Tuesday, shows that a dozen donors contributed to the trust fund in May of last year. The amounts ranged from $100,000 for the top three donors to $25 for the person who is listed as the fund’s trustee, James Atterholt, who served as Pence’s chief of staff from 2014 through 2016 when Pence was governor of Indiana.

“I believe the vice president is a decent and honorable person but he is not someone of great financial means. I started the trust because I believe significant legal bills should not be the cost of public service,” Atterholt said via email.

The six-figure donations came from Indiana Pacers owner Herbert Simon of Indianapolis and California apartment developers Michael Hayde and Laura Khouri. Half of the donors came from Pence’s home state.

The report states the money was used to pay a bill from McGuireWoods LLP. The firm’s Richard Cullen served as Pence’s lawyer in the Mueller probe. Atterholt terminated the trust on Aug. 12, 2019. Many government officials have turned to legal defense funds over the years to finance their legal representation.

The report states that every contributor had to certify that they are U.S. citizens, the money came from personal funds and that Pence did not solicit the contribution, among other requirements. The report was filed with the U.S. Office of Government Ethics.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

0
0
0
0
0

Get Government & Politics updates in your inbox!

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — President Donald Trump’s plans to kick off Independence Day with a showy display at Mount Rushmore have angered Native Americans, who view the monument as a desecration of land violently stolen from them and used to pay homage to leaders hostile to Indigenous people.

  • Updated

WASHINGTON (AP) — Eight Republican lawmakers attended a White House briefing Monday about explosive allegations that Russia secretly offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants for killing American troops in Afghanistan — intelligence the White House insisted the president himself had not been fully read in on.

  • Updated

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — More than 18 million acres of a petroleum reserve in Alaska will be opened to oil and gas drilling under a plan released Thursday by federal officials, who touted it as being key to President Donald Trump’s goal of increasing energy production.

  • Updated

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday denied that he was made aware of U.S. intelligence officials’ conclusions that Russia secretly offered bounties to Taliban-linked militants for killing American troops in Afghanistan. The Trump administration was set to brief select members of Congress on the matter on Monday.

  • Updated

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday tweeted approvingly of a video showing one of his supporters chanting “white power," a racist slogan associated with white supremacists. He later deleted the tweet and the White House said the president had not heard “the one statement” on the video.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News