{{featured_button_text}}

BISMARCK, N.D. — What do a rooster, dog paddle, a high horse, a hillbilly, an outhouse, a rocking chair and fiddle stick have in common?

They are just a few of the dance steps handed down through the decades by Irish, Scottish and German immigrant folk dancers living on the East Coast and in the Appalachian Mountains.

In Bismarck-Mandan, a group of women have continued the tradition with the Rock'n Cloggers. Once a week, they meet to hone their jingle-tapping skills to most music genres to perform at a variety of venues in the area.

"We have a lot of fun together because we're friends," said Bonnie Steiner, the group's director since 2012. "In clogging, it's really about the friendships you develop and the relationships you develop."

Clogging began in the area around 1969 when dancers riveted two stainless-steel plates to the toes and heels of their shoes. They called themselves the Capitol City Cloggers, with Patty Vollan as the dance instructor using music on 45-rpm records.

Steiner said people only need to have two basic fundamentals: balance and rhythm. "It's challenging to start, but once you get your balance and you get your feel for the music you can pretty much do anything," she said.

The group is always looking for new members. For more information, go to www.bismarckrockncloggers.com.

Get local news delivered to your inbox!

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0