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Glue spilled at Fastrax BMX

Fastrax BMX found glue leaking from its 250-gallon tote Sunday morning.

Volunteers with Fastrax BMX found glue leaking across part of its Bismarck facility Sunday morning, making a mess that may take up to two days to clean up.

The glue, which is stored in a 250-gallon plastic tote, is used as a surfacing agent to "keep the track from breaking up," allowing bikers to use the track in rainy conditions, said Track Director Jamy Mills.

Two volunteers with the south Bismarck track found glue leaking from the tote about 9 a.m. Sunday, Mills said.

Fastrax BMX posted a photo of the damage on Facebook, including photos of a footprint trail around a fence and around the 250-gallon tote. Mills said in a Tribune interview he believes people entered the facility and opened the container.

"You can see where they walk out and leave it running, they go and climb the fence and there's actually glue on the top rail of the fence going out the north side of the track," Mills said. "They were on bikes, too, because there are bike tracks on the outside of the fence."

Fastrax BMX has security cameras, but none of them were facing the northwest corner of the track where the tote was allegedly opened, said Mills.

Mills and his volunteers plan to wait until the glue dries before using a skid steer to peel it off the maintenance area of the track facility. He said it will likely take one or two days to clean, depending on how many volunteers join. 

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Despite keeping some of the glue, Mills said the tote is not refillable, and the group will have to spend $3,000 to replace it.

Mills said he hopes whoever did it will fess up and help fix the damage.

"Come be a part of our organization and be a positive part of it and not a negative part," Mills said.

Bismarck police received a report of the incident at 10:53 a.m., said Lt. Steve Scheuer. Without witnesses, there isn’t enough information to follow up with an investigation, Scheuer said.

“If somebody hears somebody talking, or if it is kids, you know, kids talking to other kids, and somebody reports to us, typically that’s the way these things are figured out,” he said.

 

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Reach Andy Tsubasa Field at 701-250-8264 or andy.field@bismarcktribune.com.

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City Government Reporter