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Over the past few weekends, I’ve had the chance to get outdoors with a buddy and go search for a few walleyes for dinner. In true fisherman style, I’m not going to tell you where the walleye searching was taking place, but I can tell you it was not in Bismarck. 

While on the walleye search, the weather was not ideal. The winds were howling with speeds near to the mid-30s mph. However, the search went on. As a surprise to me, walleyes were found quite quickly within the first stop, then the hot bite subsided as the day-time temperatures rose and wind speeds dropped.

While in the search for walleyes in the wind, several waterbirds were observed. The skies above and the water below had feathered creatures of common tern, black tern, American white pelican, double-crested cormorant, willet, white-faced ibis, marbled godwit, American avocet, great blue heron, American bittern, Virginia rail and American coot.

My favorite type of waterbirds were ever present as well, flying about chasing each other. Several species of waterfowl were observed. Mallards, northern pintail, blue-winged teal, gadwall, ruddy duck, wood duck, American wigeon, common goldeneye, green-winged teal, lesser scaup, northern shoveler, redhead, ring-necked duck and, of course, Canada geese were observed. Hearing the sound of whistling wings overhead never gets old.

While walleyes were the first targets the past few weeks, waterbirds were a close second. Since I couldn’t find abundant feeding walleyes, our abundant avifauna in the skies above and the earth below, surprised me and caught my attention.

With warm weather, for the next few months, I urge each and everyone to get off the couch, get outdoors and go seek and find our feathered friends that call this wonderful state home. You may just spot a species that doesn’t typically live here in the summer months. You can’t find those species, however, inside your houses with the humming of the air conditioner. Go sweat and enjoy the warmth of the summer sun.

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