Englund ready to see someone up the ante with Freddy Krueger
AP

Englund ready to see someone up the ante with Freddy Krueger

  • Updated
{{featured_button_text}}
Englund ready to see someone up the ante with Freddy Krueger

FILE - This July 28, 2018 file photo shows Robert Englund participating in the "Eli Roth's History of Horror " panel during the TCA Summer Press Tour in Beverly Hills, Calif. After playing Freddy Krueger on film eight times and on TV, Englund says he looks forward to seeing the “A Nightmare on Elm Street” franchise revived and someone else taking on the murderous role and upping the ante with technology and special effects.

NEW YORK (AP) — Robert Englund, the actor who turned Freddy Krueger into a fearsome household name, say he’s looking forward to someone else taking a stab at reviving the “Nightmare on Elm Street” franchise.

Englund said it's time for Krueger’s razor-fingered glove to permanently pass to another actor.

“I’m too old,” said the 72-year-old. “I know that everything gets remade eventually.”

Englund played Krueger, a murderous villain who stalks his victims through their dreams, in eight films and occasionally on TV. He acknowledges a few years ago he thought he might've had the stamina for one more “Nightmare” movie, but compares the situation to “an athlete who can't get out of bed Monday morning.”

He's eager to see someone else up the ante.

“Now with the new technologies, films are gonna get remade because we can do special effects even better and more sophisticated, and I’m kind of looking forward to seeing a new ‘Nightmare’ film where they can really go crazy with a dream landscape, with the nightmare sequences, using some of the techniques used in ‘Inception’ or in that old Robin Williams film ‘What Dreams May Come.'”

“A Nightmare on Elm Street” was revived in 2010 with Jackie Earle Haley as Freddy and also starring Rooney Mara, Katie Cassidy and Kellan Lutz. It received poor reviews but was a box office success, earning more than $115 million worldwide.

Wes Craven directed the first film in 1984, and one of the stars was a then-unknown named Johnny Depp.

“Johnny dressed very rockabilly then. He had the best hair,” recalled Englund. “He called everyone sir and ma'am.”

As for his favorite “Nightmare” film, Englund cites the seventh installment: “Wes Craven’s New Nightmare.”

“It was really a valentine to fans. We all kind of play ourselves in it and we make fun of ourselves, we make fun of Hollywood a bit. But we also made it kind of meta, you know it’s a movie within a movie," he said. "It was a little ahead of its time but after the ‘Scream’ franchise opened, a lot of the fans revisited ‘Wes Craven’s New Nightmare’ and they really picked up on the hidden Easter eggs and the sort of meta structure of it.”

Englund is currently hosting the new Travel Channel series “True Terror with Robert Englund," airing Tuesdays at 10 p.m. From screaming headlines about haunted houses to twisted accounts of people being buried alive, Englund digs up these old stories with the help of historians.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

0
0
0
0
0

Stay up-to-date on what's happening

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

NEW YORK (AP) — The stars of the 2011 virus thriller “Contagion” — a prescient film these days — have reunited for a series of public service announcements to warn about COVID-19.

  • Updated

The wine movie is not exactly known for a bouquet of tasting notes. From “Wine Country” to “Bottle Shock,” they are usually light, amiable movies that amble through sunny fields of vines. “Sideways,” of course, is the choice vintage, but most come and go about as quickly and breezily as a bottle of pinot.

  • Updated

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Kenny Rogers, the smooth, Grammy-winning balladeer who spanned jazz, folk, country and pop with such hits as “Lucille,” “Lady” and “Islands in the Stream” and embraced his persona as “The Gambler” on records and on TV, died Friday night. He was 81.

  • Updated

From finding ways to help others cope to sheltering in place to canceling events, here’s a look at some of the ways the entertainment industry is reacting to the spread of the coronavirus, which most people recover from but can cause severe illness in the elderly and those with preexisting medical conditions.

  • Updated

If you’re looking for something truly inspirational to distract from the current state of things, Netflix’s “Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution” might be just the ticket. This documentary focuses on an idyllic summer camp for kids and teens with disabilities in the Catskills in the early '70s that turned out to be a breeding ground for the modern disability rights movement.

  • Updated

NEW YORK (AP) — The stars of the 2011 virus thriller “Contagion” — a prescient film these days — have reunited for a series of public service announcements to warn about COVID-19.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News