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Buggies-N-Blues rolls back into Mandan
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Buggies-N-Blues rolls back into Mandan

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Thousands of people are expected to fill Main Street in Mandan this weekend as Buggies-N-Blues returns after being canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic last year.

The two-day event hosted by the Mandan Progress Organization starts at 3 p.m. Saturday with live music, food and retail vendors, and a beer garden in Heritage Park and along Main Street. 

Starting at 8 p.m. Saturday, the classic car parade will depart from Mandan High School, continue down Sixth Avenue Northwest and proceed east on Main Street.

After the parade there's an evening concert and street dance featuring the band Moments Notice. Admission is $5. Tickets will be available at the gate.

Sunday activities include a free classic car show, the Buggies-N-Blues swap meet and music performances. Food vendors will be available beginning at 11 a.m.

This year's theme is "American Graffiti." The event features a Wolfman Jack impersonator and cars from the 1973 film.

For more information go to www.buggies-n-blues.org.

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