020718-nws-giving-hearts

Century High School seniors Jordan Bentz, left, and Carly Amundson celebrate after Carly bowled a successful frame at Midway Lanes in Mandan on Tuesday. The Bismarck Public Schools Foundation has formed an inclusive sports program for students of all abilities and is one of the groups benefiting from this year's Giving Hearts Day. 

"The public needs to take responsibility for what they want their state to be. If we don't do that, then we're going to have to settle for what somebody else gives us. And we may not like that."

-- Al Sapa, a retired wildlife biologist, in the film called "Keeping All the Pieces" aimed at trying to minimize impacts of energy development on the state's natural resources. The Badlands Conservation Alliance and the North Dakota Wildlife Federation released the film.

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"The biggest impact that it does besides the dollars that it raises is the awareness for the different foundations and nonprofits."

-- Kayla Effertz Kleven, executive director of the Bismarck Public Schools Foundation, on Giving Hearts Day.

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"If we don't listen and work together to find solutions for this great state, the criminals win, not us."

-- Monica Mayer, councilwoman for the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, during a conference on tribal, state and federal relations. Mayer cited some of the challenges facing reservations, including assaults on Native American women.

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"I think a lot of people were excited for the idea of a North Dakota Western film. People in western North Dakota are so connected with the land."

-- Daniel Bielinski, the director of the University of Mary's theater department, on filming "The Badlands Girl," a period Western set in 1895 in the Badlands.

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"We have so many similarities between our two families. I really feel like we were meant to be in each other's lives."

-- Tabatha Ballein, of Williston, who served as a surrogate mother for Shannon Mouser and Seth Paskin, of Austin, Texas.

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"(Vision care) is needed in all ZIP codes. One in four students has a vision issue that can affect them in the classroom and out on the sports field."

-- Rachel Weiner, director of vision programming for the Eagles Charitable Foundation. The Philadelphia Eagles Eye Mobile, a mobile eye clinic that provides free eye examinations and makes prescription eyeglasses on the spot for students, came to Bismarck before the Super Bowl because Bismarck is Carson Wentz’s hometown.

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"It hurts to see people leave treatment, and they have no support. I'm here to get the help to people who need it, where they can get it."

-- Joe Fay, who completed drug treatment two years ago and works for the Heartview Foundation in Cando, on helping others deal with addiction.

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"It's really nice to see it wind down and be able to utilize it for what we've been dreaming of."

-- Ken Pilon, Dakota Leathernecks founding member, on the near completion of a clubhouse.

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"The people of North Dakota will be voting on the Blue Law repeal this November, but instead of voting for a measure they will be voting for their representatives. The goal will be to educate and shine a light on candidates and where they stand on the blue law. Do they support freedom and flexibility for North Dakota businesses and families, or do they support the 1889 Swiss cheese law that few understand and is unenforceable?"

-- Brandon Medenwald, on switching from an initiative measure on repealing blue laws to plans to seek legislation in 2019.

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"It would restore it back to where it was. And it would bring money back to the citizens of North Dakota that was stolen in a shady last-minute deal in the final days of the (legislative session)."

-- Ed Gruchalla, a former Democratic state lawmaker from Fargo who's chairing an effort to get a ballot measure that would boost the oil extraction tax from 5 percent to its previous rate of 6.5 percent.

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