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BisMan Bombshellz skaters work on offensive maneuvering in a practice drill with teammates recently at the Capital Ice Arena. From left are Diamond Stokes, known as Princess Cut, Julie Holsinger, known as Juicifer, Demy Hall, known as Demygod, and Sienna Salo, known as Frida K.O.

"Most agencies have grown to a point where space is a priority, especially in this building. We've been looking at different ways of trying to increase space and see what our options are."

-- Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier on the renovation of the Morton County Jail.

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"The lack of snow is concerning in areas scarred by the worst drought to hit North Dakota since 2006. We do not have the excess moisture we had last fall and winter."

-- State climatologist Adnan Akyuz.

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"We just really support each other as a team. You don't have to come in here being a super athlete or having a background in college sports. Some of them have never played organized sports before."

-- Sara Frank, on the BisMan Bombshellz roller derby team.

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"Backpage has been nothing but an online brothel for years. This will give us the tools that we have been asking for for a long time."

-- Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem, after the Senate voted 97-2 to approve the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act, which allows websites that facilitate sex trafficking to be held liable and enables victims to seek justice.

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"You're starting to see some investment back in the Bakken in recognition that its economics have improved so much."

-- Ron Ness, president of the North Dakota Petroleum Council.

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"One year is not so bad. Most people can get by on one year. But two years in a row, that would be pretty catastrophic."

-- John Weinand, who farms near Beulah and is past president of the North Dakota Grain Growers Association, on the possibility of a second year of drought.

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"We know it has been a difficult couple of days, but we are working with law enforcement who we hope will be able to track all three calls and put an end to these school disruptions."

-- Bismarck Public School Superintendent Tamara Uselman, after three bomb threats disrupted Legacy High School.

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"Your children are calling you, running out of school (and) you're wondering where they're going to be because it does take awhile to get them to safety. I'm sure they trained for this and that's why they brought them here (a safe site). I'm just thankful that nothing actually happened."

-- Sonya Kaiser, who has two sons who are freshmen at Legacy, after the school was evacuated on Monday.

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"It is a world of opportunities for kids in a field that is going to be increasing in demand over time. Hopefully, this is one of the areas we can prepare kids for a future career — at least give them the opportunity to explore a potential area of interest that we haven't had up until this point for a while."

-- Jeff Lind, assistant superintendent for Mandan Public Schools, on plans to offer a computer science course.

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"Gun violence has invaded our schools, it has also plagued our places of worship, our theaters, our clubs, our concerts and even the parking lots of our grocery stores. We cannot arm every usher, religious leader and cashier. Rather than promoting reactive measures, it's time we begin promoting preventative ones."

-- Katie Tschosik, a senior at Bismarck High School, speaking last week at the March for Our Lives rally in Bismarck.

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"It's a crown jewel of North Dakota, really, if you think about it."

-- John Warford, Bismarck's former mayor, on the Missouri River and plans for the Heritage River Landing.

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