Proposed Davis Refinery site

The proposed Davis Refinery is to be located on private property west of Belfield and near the east boundary of Theodore Roosevelt National Park. A public hearing by the North Dakota Department of Health was held in Dickinson recently for the air quality permit. 

"That would have had a real and devastating impact directly on the lives of some of North Dakota's most vulnerable people and we could not let that happen."

-- Diana Hall, chairwoman of the North Dakota Coalition for Homeless People, on the decision to eliminate its two paid staff members to prevent North Dakota homeless service providers from losing federal funding.

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"I don't know what our legal authority is to do a lot of that. To have a project evaluated on all of its merits at one time, I think that makes some sense to do that. That's maybe something we can start having a conversation on."

-- Dave Glatt, chief of the Environmental Health Section, on whether to require Meridian to apply for a siting permit for the Davis Refinery from the Public Service Commission.

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"It puts us in an interesting position with tourism and with economic development. We're very concerned about both of them. We've had numerous discussions about that. I don't think tourism will be hurt."

-- Commerce Commissioner Jay Schuler, on the state tourism division not weighing in on the Davis Refinery.

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"The dream of many small communities is that a business or businesses will come in hopes of keeping their rural community alive."

-- Natalie Muruato, Belfield city auditor, testifying in favor of the Davis Refinery.

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"These are people who make the industry what it is."

-- Heather LeMoine, marketing manager for state tourism, on a campaign called ND Travel Matters, which focuses on the behind-the-scenes of tourism in the state.

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"Governing is a team effort."

-- Gov. Doug Burgum, in his State of the State address.

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"I can't imagine not wearing a seat belt, but at the same time I just don't like seeing government rule everybody's lives."

-- Sen. Lonnie Laffen, R-Grand Forks, on why he would oppose a law allowing law enforcement to stop and ticket motorists for not wearing seat belts.

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"There are many paths to recovery, and, as care coordinators, you will have the rewarding yet challenging opportunity to connect individuals to housing, employment, social supports, peers and clinical services."

-- First lady Kathryn Helgaas Burgum, addressing providers during a care coordinator training program.

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"We tend to underestimate the importance of computer science. It really truly is a foundational subject. (The Technology Education and Literacy in Schools) program really does nurture the potential for a strong, permanent, sustainable computer science program in schools."

-- State Superintendent Kirsten Baesler, announcing that schools can participate in the Microsoft program, TEALS.

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"I think it's really important to empower individual citizens and to show citizens that we have the power to defend ourselves successfully and win."

-- Alex Wilson, who has twice successfully defended herself in Dakota Access Pipeline protest trials.

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"If you talk to people who don't like it, it's because they don't like that they can't drive 40 (miles per hour) in what was a 25, because it's safer for pedestrians and the multimodal forms of transportation because we've now done exactly what we tried to do, which was calm that traffic and make it better and more efficient. At the end of the day, this is the right move."

-- Bismarck City Commissioner Josh Askvig, as the commission voted 4-1 to permanently convert to three lanes on Main Avenue, from Mandan Street through Sixth Street.

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"It's just this spectacular big tree. You see it from 150 feet and think, ‘Holy cow.'"

-- Jim Fuglie, who along with his wife, Lillian Crook, owns a state champion red oak tree in Highland Acres.

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