bison culling

The culling of the wild bison herd in the South Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park near Fryburg on Monday.

MIKE MCCLEARY TRIBUNE

"We have a constant need for animals because our tribal herds are being used, they're being utilized the way they traditionally have been, for food source, for ceremonial purposes."

— Patrick Toomey, range technician for the InterTribal Buffalo Council. Tribes that belong to the council will receive bison culled from Theodore Roosevelt National Park this week.

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"With our winters and our winter quickly approaching, there's not a lot of options that are there. We as a community have to figure that issue out."

 Kurt Snyder, Heartview Foundation's executive director, after Heartview agreed to purchase the Ruth Meiers Hospitality House men’s shelter. Now funding and staff need to be found to operate the shelter.

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"One step further, in these new rules, is that I wish we'd be more diligent in enforcing these and all rules that are on the books. Accidents can happen, but negligence, there should be no tolerance for negligence."

 Bottineau County landowner Daryl Peterson, testifying about rules related to spills.

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"The act does exist and we do recognize that we need to maintain this scenic river in a free-flowing and natural state. We are not going to be issuing permits where we're going to basically suck the river dry."

 Jon Patch, director of water appropriations for the State Water Commission, commenting on the Little Missouri River.

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"The question is are there opportunities in the marketplace for something that's not a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house that will better fit the coming demographic shifts across the country."

 Jim Kumon of the Incremental Development Alliance, addressing a group of Bismarck-Mandan developers.

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"There are 12,000 pieces in a piano, 230 strings and there are 150 to 180 pounds of pressure per string."

 Piano tuner Blaine Lutz, who has come out of retirement.

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"We fought for each other."

 Col. Richard Stevens, of Grand Forks' Company M of North Dakota's famed 164th Infantry Regiment, discussing the battle of Guadalcanal.

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"We've been a commercial winery for four years, and this is probably the best harvest we've seen in terms of both fruit and grapes."

 Randy Albrecht, operator of Wolf Creek Winery in Coleharbor.

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"For us, this was huge. We were going on our second year where we still didn't have an application that came through, which, unfortunately, for rural America ... we're seeing more and more of that where we're just hoping that we get one or two applicants for any position that comes along."

 Beach Superintendent David Wegner, on recruiting a woman in town who had studied agriculture in college as an agricultural teacher.

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"That is not OK, and it keeps me up at night ... obviously, what we were doing for 15 years was not working. We have to re-examine that, and we have to do things differently."

 State Superintendent Kirsten Baesler, on the dropout rate among Native American students.

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"I think it's a strong signal from the North Dakota Supreme Court of support for the due process and the right of defendants in these cases to have adequate representation and to be treated fairly by the judicial system."

 Attorney Bruce Nestor, reacting to a state Supreme Court decision allowing out-of-state attorneys to continue assisting Dakota Access Pipeline protesters facing charges.

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