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Volunteers Kate Brovold, left, and Twila Johnson were making name tags for the more than 800 people who registered and were lined up in the Bismarck Event Center for Recovery Reinvented on Tuesday morning. "We are doing whatever they ask us to do — set up chairs, direct traffic, we're the welcome wagon," said Johnson, a registered nurse. Brovold is the founder and executive director of Austin's Mission, a detox center soon to open in south Bismarck.

This is Up and Down, where we give a brief thumbs up and thumbs down on the issues from the past week.

Up

Gov. Doug Burgum has been working to reinvent government and his latest effort appears to have been successful. About 1,000 people gathered last week for Recovery Reinvented, an event that looked at addiction and recovery. It’s no secret that the state has had a drinking problem for many years. First lady Kathryn Helgaas Burgum has made addiction issues her focus during her husband’s first term. Hopefully, the governor’s office can keep stressing the issue and find ways to change the state’s culture that at times seems to embrace drinking.

Down

A new state law got its apparent first test last week and the Tribune Editorial Board still isn’t happy with it. Under a change made by the 2017 Legislature the names of applicants for statewide offices won’t be released until finalists are selected. It was announced Thursday that there are 26 candidates for commissioner of the North Dakota Department of Trust Lands. The name of a 27th candidate is known as Land Commissioner Lance Gaebe announced he will apply to retain his job. Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem doesn’t like the new law, noting “The public is always interested in who applies.” The reason for the change is the fear that good candidates won’t apply if their names are made public. The Tribune believes government conducted in secret isn’t good government.

Up

Jennifer and Andrew Holle, two dairy farmers who live south of Mandan, are taking part in the 26.2-mile Bank of America Chicago Marathon. The Holles will be join 25  other runners on the national team for the Fuel Up to Play 60 program, which is a collaboration between the National Football League and the National Dairy Council. The Holles are participating to promote a healthy lifestyle through running. It’s an activity they have passed on to their four children and they hope others will adopt by following their example. The marathon is Oct. 8.

Down

A new report says North Dakota women experience one of the country's worst gender pay gaps. The American Association of University Women released its analysis Tuesday reporting women in North Dakota had median annual earnings of $38,407 last year compared to $51,789 for men. That amounts to an earnings ratio of 74 percent, ranking North Dakota 45th among the states. New York had the highest ratio of 89 percent, while Louisiana and Utah tied for the lowest at 70 percent. This gap doesn’t just impact women, but their spouses and families. If it continues, it doesn’t bode well for North Dakota’s future.

Up

Mandan had plenty to be proud about as last week it unveiled its Starion Sports Complex at 111 Old Red Trail N.E. It will provide facilities for the Mandan boys and girls hockey teams. And the Braves football team broke in the 2,000-seat Leon House Track and Field stadium. Residents have been anticipating the facility since giving it approval. The 84,000-square-foot facility offers 450 paved parking spaces. It’s operated by the Mandan Park District. The complex will be enjoyed not just by Mandan fans, but by its many visitors.

Down

It’s always disappointing to see a dispute divide a small community. An effort to recall Washburn Mayor Larry Thomas has prompted other city commission members to vote to install $5,550 in security cameras in city hall. This has just increased the divide between Thomas supporters and opponents. Hopefully, Washburn can resolve the issues without the community becoming more divided.

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