Trump speech

Joining President Donald Trump, left, on stage at the Andeavor Mandan Refinery were from left, Sen. John Hoeven, Gov. Doug Burgum, Lt. Gov. Brent Sanford, Rep. Kevin Cramer and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp. Trump invited the officials to the stage during his welcoming remarks on Sept. 6. 

"The pipefitters and plumbers, and nurses, and police officers — all the people like you who pour their hearts into every penny earned in both the offices and oilfields of America — you're the ones who carry this nation on your back, and it's time for you to get the relief that you deserve."

— President Donald Trump, during Wednesday’s speech at the Andeavor Mandan Refinery.

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"We love this state, so it's always a pleasure to be back here. And you treated us very, very well in November and have continued to, so we like sharing the love back."

— Ivanka Trump, addressing the crowd at the Andeavor Mandan Refinery on Wednesday.

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"It's not every day that the president of the United States comes to your workplace, so it's very exciting."

— Randy Binegar, an environmental superintendent and 28-year employee of the Andeavor Mandan Refinery. He added that employees were honored to host the president.

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"We had a great time. We didn't really think we'd be able to shake his hand, but he took a lot of time and shook everybody's hand."

— Trevor Kronberg, an oilfield worker whose cousin works for the Secret Service, on greeting President Donald Trump at the Bismarck airport on Wednesday.

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"We need somebody like Trump that changes the whole format of our thinking. I don't care if it's our county commissions to our township boards. The more we let other people lead us, that is the direction you're going to go. You have to get involved a little bit or be satisfied with the direction from your county to your township to your state."

— Robert Tweeten, a Hensler farmer and rancher and Trump supporter, as he waited for Trump’s motorcade to arrive on Wednesday.

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"I don't think the fact that they weren't citizens was really relevant to them at the time. There's always been the desire to protect and serve the country where you live."

— Marilyn Hudson, longtime director of the Three Affiliated Tribes Museum, on Native Americans who served in World War I.

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"Our philosophy and our practice is we reach out to all of the tribes and share information and ask them if they're interested in talking to us. It is in our best interest, as well as for the project and all stakeholders, to be as open and transparent as possible."

— NextEra spokesman Steve Stengel, on how the company works with tribes when planning wind farms.

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"This small parcel is not going to make or break the lease sale, but it could make or break the park as it relates to the visitor experience."

— Valerie Naylor, former superintendent of Theodore Roosevelt National Park and a consultant for the National Parks Conservation Association, discussing a possible Bureau of Land Management oil and gas lease near the North Unit. BLM is collecting public comments.

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"The taxation is not about greed. It’s about need."

— Mark Fox, chairman of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation, explaining to the Legislature's Tribal Taxation Issues Committee why the tribes want more taxes from oil development on the Fort Berthold Reservation.

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"To whom much is given, much will be expected."

— Molly Zosel, of Mandan, explaining her motivation for volunteering with the Red Cross.

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"We want businesses to understand this value ... not just work with us because of a charitable mindset. We truly believe our specialists are the most qualified fit for the roles we're placing them in."

— James Whirlwind Soldier, business development director for Mind Shift, a Fargo-based nonprofit with the goal of finding meaningful careers for people on the autism spectrum.

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