Hay

Bales in a field near Pettibone will be gathered soon for winter feeding. Ranchers in drought-stricken areas of North Dakota and Montana have turned to Conservation Reserve Program acres, as well as cash crops, to put together enough feed for their livestock. Photo taken Sept. 19. 

Jenny Schlecht, Agweek

"If we can be so clever as human beings to drill Bakken wells that go 2 miles down and 2 miles out, we ought to at least be looking at what kind of possibilities there are for water usage that don't involve damaging our one and only Little Missouri State Scenic River."

— Jan Swenson, executive director of the Badlands Conservation Alliance, questioning how much water the oil industry should be able to withdraw from the Little Missouri River.

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"It's helping all the producers and royalty owners regardless of whether those barrels are actually traveling down the Dakota Access Pipeline. That has really set the market and made the transportation much more competitive leaving North Dakota."

 Tax Commissioner Ryan Rauschenberger, discussing the impact of the Dakota Access Pipeline on oil prices.

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"It's time to give a voice to these voiceless women. It's time to bring their perpetrators to justice and give a voice to the families who are struggling even today, sometimes decades later, to understand how this can happen in America."

 Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., introducing Savanna's Act in honor of Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind. The legislation would require data collection and remove barriers to help tribal law enforcement seek justice.

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"The BLM methane rule imposed unworkable and duplicative requirements on our energy industry."

 Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., praising an Interior Department move to delay an Obama-era regulation aimed at restricting methane emissions from oil and gas production on federal lands.

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"We were kept in the dark. We were told that (the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) prevented us from knowing anything. This is a system issue, and the issue (is) that parents and students aren't informed of their rights as victims."

 Kristin Wentz-Krumwiede, a parent, saying she wasn’t made aware of safeguards against bullying by the Bismarck School District.

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"It's a horrible thing; it really is. We're committed to doing whatever we need to do to prevent (bullying and harassment). Even though we have a lot of things in place, I really look forward to us reviewing that ... whatever it's going to take."

 Bismarck School Board President Karl Lembke, on plans to review the district’s bullying policies.

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"I can't keep them in jail long enough to make them better."

 Cass County Commissioner Chad Peterson, on the difficulty of helping inmates with drug and alcohol problems.

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"Marsy's Law posed a lot of questions that we don't have the answers to, that the courts are going to have to provide answers to."

 Chief Deputy Attorney General Troy Seibel, addressing the interim Judiciary Committee.

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"We appreciate FEMA's consideration of our request. In addition to the many actions taken by the state to help livestock producers, we felt they also deserved an attempt to seek federal disaster assistance, and as a state we will continue to do everything in our power to help them recover."

 Gov. Doug Burgum, after the federal government rejected a request for a disaster declaration due to the drought.

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"Even though they are a private company they used the government to protect and advance their project. We tread on dangerous ground when we use government law enforcement to advance private interests."

 Sen. Tim Mathern, D-N.D., after Dakota Access LLC donated $15 million to help pay for law enforcement costs related to the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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"The Dakota Access Pipeline was under no obligation to give the state any money, so it was really out of generosity that they did it."

 Gov. Doug Burgum, on the donation by Dakota Access LLC.

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