Helms says EPA could halt fracking in oil patch

2011-11-27T00:30:00Z Helms says EPA could halt fracking in oil patchLAUREN DONOVAN | Bismarck Tribune Bismarck Tribune

With millions, if not billions, of dollars hanging over the ledge, the boom in the oil patch would go into a free-fall if drilling suddenly stopped.

Thousands of workers unemployed overnight, housing starts abandoned, businesses shuttered and bustling oil towns from Williston to Belfield emptying out instead of filling up are all part of a future few would prefer — even if they despair of the changes to land and lifestyle wrought by the upswing of oil.

Even with oil near $100 a barrel and 200 rigs drilling in North Dakota last week, the specter of some sort of free-fall caused by a federal push to regulate hydraulic fracture treatment weighs heavily on Lynn Helms. He’s the director of the Department of Mineral Resources, the one man most in charge of this seemingly unstoppable surge centered on the Bakken.

Every single well in the Bakken and associated formations is fracture-treated. By now, that amounts to 3,000 wells, a fraction of future oilfield development. Fracking, with high-pressure injections of water, sand and chemicals, has so far proved the only successful way to make oil flow from the dense source rock.

Helms believes the Environmental Protection Agency is on track to stop fracking as soon as January, when state regulators must write new rules for fracture treatment based on an EPA guidance document that is under review by the Office of Management and Budget.

The document will tell states how to comply with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and write permits under the act’s underground injection control Class II well program when diesel fuels are used in fracking fluids, an authority the EPA said it has in a statement to the Tribune.

Here’s how Helms said he sees that evolving.

In January, the EPA will release the guidance document to states. Then, his department will write a new section of state rules to comply with the document. Those are referred to the State Industrial Commission for adoption, but first are opened for public hearing.

By January 2013, the state would be able to complete its rulemaking, which the EPA must first publish in the Federal Register, possibly in the first quarter of that year, before the state could begin permitting hydraulic fracturing.

In the meantime, Helms said, he believes there will be a moratorium on fracking because of the history of many-months moratoriums in Alabama, when the EPA, because of an environmental lawsuit, revoked Alabama’s underground injection program until the state wrote new rules specific to fracking under Class II well standards.

“I believe it will be stopped cold for 12 to 24 months. The best case is 15 months and that’s only if we red-lighted everything else and got nothing else done,” Helms said.

Three separate fracking moratoriums came and went in Alabama as the situation went through courts and appeals that were based on the reasoning that fracking is a temporary injection leading to production, unlike Class II saltwater disposal wells, which are injection wells for their lifetime.

Helms said drilling in Alabama never regained its pre-moratorium vigor.

Once the regulatory dust settles and the rules are in place, the process to permit fracking as Class II wells will be lengthy, at least if it must follow the same protocol as saltwater disposal well permitting.

Helms said there’s an area of review around saltwater wells, requirements to sample all existing water wells, surface rules that come into play, public hearings — all followed by an Industrial Commission order, a process that takes 60 to 90 days.

His message: Once any moratorium is over and rules are in place, the result will be a lengthy red-tape process for each and every fracture treatment.

This begs the question: If the EPA is using diesel as its handle to regulate fracking as a Class II well under the Safe Drinking Water Act, why not just eliminate the diesel? It’s a relatively small part of what goes into fracking fluid.

Helms said — and so does the national FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry for some 7,000 wells, including many in North Dakota — the typical amount of diesel is around .088 percent of the fracture fluid. That amounts to 4,400 gallons in 5 million gallons of fracking fluid.

Monte Besler, a fracture treatment consultant with a company called FracN8tr, said many companies have already eliminated diesel and use mineral or vegetable oil as the gelling agent that helps suspend sand particles in the injection fluid.

Diesel or some distillate gets used only when it’s very cold and other oils would freeze or when there’s no available alternative.

“If you didn’t have cold in North Dakota, probably no one would use diesel,” Besler said.

Helms said it may not be that simple.

The EPA has indicated it will define diesel fuel based on its physical and chemical characteristics, not with a precise Chemical Abstract Services number. A definition that broad could throw a blanket over any oil, even canola oil, if it has the same characteristics as diesel, Helms said. Mineral oil, used in fracking instead of diesel as well as for many household purposes, is a highly-refined petroleum product.

The State Industrial Commission recently sent a letter to the EPA that underscores its opposition to federal regulation.

The letter said, in part, “As late as 2008, EPA had done nothing with regard to nationwide regulation of hydraulic fracturing operations utilizing diesel fuels and continued to stand by its 2004 study finding that hydraulic fracturing poses little or no threat to Underground Sources of Drinking Water. The typical North Dakota Bakken frac contains 0.088% petroleum distillates. If EPA persists with regulation of diesel fuel hydraulic fracturing under UIC Class II along with a new and unique definition of diesel fuel, North Dakota oil and gas investment and jobs would come to a standstill, and potentially never return to the activity and growth we are seeing today.”

No one at the EPA returned phone calls for this story, including Ann Codrington, the acting director for EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Act program.

An EPA spokeswoman issued a statement in response to questions from the Tribune, but said it was attributable to the agency, not her.

The statement explained the agency’s authority and goals in developing guidance for fracking under the Class II underground injection control program. It said that the “EPA has not made a decision on the definition of diesel fuels at this time.”

The Legislature allocated $1 million in the recent special redistricting session for a legal challenge against the EPA. Helms said it’s likely North Dakota will band with other oil- and gas-producing states for an injunction while it asks the court to weigh in.

The EPA is once again studying the effects of fracking on drinking water, and aquifers at a well near Killdeer that blew out during fracture treatment have been sampled as part of the study.

At the very least, the EPA should await its own study results before proceeding with fracture treatment regulation, the Industrial Commission said in its letter.

Helms said, “The EPA needs to stop this until they finish their study, and then we can talk about who should regulate how.”

Reach reporter Lauren Donovan at 220-5511 or lauren@westriv.com.

Copyright 2015 Bismarck Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

(42) Comments

  1. Point to Ponder
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    Point to Ponder - December 03, 2011 2:58 pm
    Bakken Shale oil, Alberta Tar Sands, Deep Sea drilling, Arctic Tundra drilling, etc.

    ERoEI

    Energy Returned over Energy Invested

    We're reaching a point where this equation isn't going to pan out anymore.

  2. bakkenpaysmybills
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    bakkenpaysmybills - December 01, 2011 5:59 am
    What I find most humorous about all this is it's people who don't live in the oil patch getting all upset here about fracking. How about those who don't live near the Bakken stay out of it and mind you own business. If these animals are really dying and such we should let those reveal their names and addresses so the rest of us can go see this first hand. Those videos are a joke on the Bakken Watch. Where is you proof that is from North Dakota? I saw lab reports on there without a facility name, so how is anyone suppose to believe it came from the Bakken?

    Relating oil to the rise in healthcare costs is a joke. Drilling had been going on for how long in the U.S.? I would more blame our own personal habits and choices on our rising healthcare costs. While we are at it we should ban smoking, alcohol, and yes the fast food restaurants also. I am not going to believe for one minute that fracking 2 miles underneath the surface is going to cause a mad rush of health issues.

    People need to understand why fracking is bad in certain areas of the U.S. It occurs much closer to the surface and one of these wells could be drilled right in the middle of a town. On the other hand North Dakota drilling is completley different. We are much more rural and going 2 miles underneath the surface. Use your common sense.

    The towns in the Bakken are overloaded but again let the people who live up there deal with it and voice their opinions. Those who don't live near the oil, mind your own business!
  3. fasozupow
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    fasozupow - November 30, 2011 8:55 pm
    Jaxxon said: "Hey, my cousin just bought a $30,000 Tundra with his mineral rights, and my other cousin bought a new set teeth $20,000 and my mom put in a new bath tub and toilet! I put in a new winsheild to my car, my kids bought I-tunes all with money from mineral rights... and thats just a beginning, all from local bussinesses PEOPLE ....how much $$$$$$ is being spent back into YOUR comunitty. BT do a Sunday story on this....!!"

    I totally agree. I think the Tribune should feature a story about this and I really think you should write it. I really do.

  4. Jaxxon
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    Jaxxon - November 30, 2011 8:18 pm
    Show me one 1 study that shows Fracking led to any damaged drinking water. Show me one.
  5. Jaxxon
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    Jaxxon - November 30, 2011 8:14 pm
    Hey, my cousin just bought a $30,000 Tundra with his mineral rights, and my other cousin bought a new set teeth $20,000 and my mom put in a new bath tub and toilet! I put in a new winsheild to my car, my kids bought I-tunes all with money from mineral rights... and thats just a beginning, all from local bussinesses PEOPLE ....how much $$$$$$ is being spent back into YOUR comunitty. BT do a Sunday story on this....!!
  6. fasozupow
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    fasozupow - November 30, 2011 12:38 pm
    How is the Bakken affecting the rest of the country?

    Is it raising people's incomes or raising their property values or making it easier to find work anywhere other than in the Bakken? No, no, no. Is is lowering our prices at the pump? I think not, but I'll grant that it should be. It is also giving a lot of people who are un- or under-employed hope of a promised land where money is plentiful and life is easy. On the other hand, if posed health concerns are even 1/2 correct, we will all pay dearly in rising health insurance costs.

    How about people who have long lived in the Bakken area?

    They have seen their cost of living skyrocket and their quality of living plummet. Have you been to Williston lately? It's an eye-opener. People are being forced out of their apartments and people are leaving town.

    How about people who have flocked to the Bakken area?

    They're making a good wage to be sure, but it's largely offset by high living costs -- and the quality of living is what one would expect from crowded, dangerous streets and residing in man camps and people's basements. And what are all of those people that are buying and building houses going to do when the drilling surge ends, as it will, in ten years or so. They'll be out of work and defaulting on mortgages while the rest of the country has found more long term ways of rising out of the recession.

    How about the oil companies exploiting the Bakken?

    They will be quite rich and almost all of their profits will be in the bank accounts of their CEOs. Keep in mind that there was a devilishly clever reason that "trickle" down economics wasn't called "flow" down.
  7. fasozupow
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    fasozupow - November 30, 2011 12:04 pm
    Let's say a company starts up to sell one item. It sells frames for glasses with these little handles that make it really easy to take them on and off without applying stress to the frames. The handle also has a lit...tle nose brake that keeps the glasses from sliding down. They name them Optigrabs. They prove popular and business is booming.

    Then, someone notices that people wearing them have their eyes constantly drawn toward the handle and they end up cockeyed. Sales fall to zero and lawsuits start pouring in. The company's millionaire owner is reduced to a penniless pauper.

    This is a story of two morals:

    1. When you go into business, it is a good idea to make sure that what you are producing and how you are producing it is safe. 2. If you only produce one thing, you have nothing to fall back on if you lose the ability to produce that one thing.

    Some businesses simply deserve to fall on hard times.
  8. Amandap
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    Amandap - November 29, 2011 11:34 pm
    The EPA is out of line. Jobs finally get created and Obama's regulators want to shut them down. This is rediculous. I would love to see the EPA pencil pushers be backed up to actually protecting the environment instead of trying to control the taxpayers who fund their salary. They are simply trying to protect their jobs - not the environment.
  9. reality
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    reality - November 29, 2011 2:35 pm
    NoDak Hunter said: "How are the issues explained then with regard to drinking water in and around fracking? I know of one friend that had fracking being done next to his home. within days after they started, his water went bad, 21 cattle died within the next few weeks. He took water coming out of his well to the county, the state and the fracking company,..no answers except you may want to use filters! Then a little while later the county said he should not drink it, but no information. I have heard of these issues elsewhere in the Bakken, but this one I know."


    Wow. You would think the news would be all over this story. Especially if it is true.
  10. reality
    Report Abuse
    reality - November 29, 2011 2:33 pm
    What will happen if the EPA does a study a finds unacceptable levels of pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and other chemicals being used by farmers and city dwellers hoping to raise bumper crops or prize roses? We have round up ready crops. Average city dwellers use way more chemicals then farmers per square foot. Maybe it should all be banned. Chemicals run off into rivers, streams, and soak into ground. This will not only poison your water but we eat the crops sprayed with these poisons. The oil is only burned and not eaten.
  11. NoDak Hunter
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    NoDak Hunter - November 29, 2011 7:51 am
    How are the issues explained then with regard to drinking water in and around fracking? I know of one friend that had fracking being done next to his home. within days after they started, his water went bad, 21 cattle died within the next few weeks. He took water coming out of his well to the county, the state and the fracking company,..no answers except you may want to use filters! Then a little while later the county said he should not drink it, but no information. I have heard of these issues elsewhere in the Bakken, but this one I know.
  12. figureitout
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    figureitout - November 29, 2011 6:38 am
    Also, thanks for fracking 101. Now some have an idea of what's going on. A little more research and you all will be right on track!
  13. figureitout
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    figureitout - November 29, 2011 6:04 am
    Ever think the "bakken watch" and their desperate followers are land owners? I'm sure they are not pleased that some of their land is creating jobs and helping the entire United States, get over it. They don't own the mineral rights! Therefore,lets pretend to be movie producers. Yeah, thats its. God bless any animals hurt in the making of these films!
  14. M2236
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    M2236 - November 28, 2011 11:08 pm
    The EPA must now be charged with making sure the unemployment rate in North Dakota follows the rest of the country. Less than 4 percent is unacceptable! You can put your trust in that if they get their way!
  15. M2236
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    M2236 - November 28, 2011 10:22 pm
    It doesn't seem to take very much study for some people to distrust Mr. Helms. Is the EPA trustworthy? How can you tell?
  16. Just Curious
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    Just Curious - November 28, 2011 9:25 pm
    As a geologist (one who does NOT work in oil) I have very few issues with frac'ing in ND.

    What I do have issue with is the lack of bad publicity the state and EPA are getting over their VERY lax attitude towards an astonishing number of large saltwater spills that are taking place. In particular, I am thinking of the Charlson area. Lots of old oilfield infrastructure up there is being pressed back into service without any pressure testing of old lines.

    Hint hint here Trib writers and editors, demand an accounting, description, environmental problems, and cost from the NDDH, U.S. Forest Service, and Corps of Engineers of all the spills and fines levied against those who are ACTUALLY polluting the shallow groundwater (the stuff people drink) and Lake Sakakawea. I think it would be a very appreciated read.
  17. Report Abuse
    - November 28, 2011 8:41 pm
    Hobson's choice is right on. Helms should go. He does not represent North Dakota but we are paying his salary.

    The other factless nonsense regarding Obama is pathetic. Not one of you can cite any facts that even suggests the Obama and his administration wants to stop energy development--not in oil, not in coal, not offshore, not in anything. It is just made up and making up stuff is lying so that makes the tellers ?
  18. NRR
    Report Abuse
    NRR - November 28, 2011 3:22 pm
    rover27 said: "I'm sorry that Obama couldn't wave his magic wand and make the damage from the disastrous eight Bush years go away overnight. "

    You're right, unfortunately he stole Bush's wand and continued those same flawed policies while adding his own disastrous ones.
  19. NRR
    Report Abuse
    NRR - November 28, 2011 3:19 pm
    Purple-Stater said: "So if I'm understanding this right, we have a strong "conservative" group here who favors disbanding the EPA completely so that we can get the oil, and the money that comes with it *NOW*. Never mind that we can easily make the western half of the state uninhabitable within 50 years in the process.Because government is bad and big corporate America will save us all.That about sum it up?"

    How does extracting oil 2 miles from the surface cause the land to be "uninhabitable"? Your strawman attempt was quite humorous though, next time be more subtle.
  20. WinnieJ
    Report Abuse
    WinnieJ - November 28, 2011 2:48 pm
    And this wasn't thought of sooner because......
  21. rover27
    Report Abuse
    rover27 - November 28, 2011 2:42 pm
    Concerned Conservative said: "How’s that hope and change working for you? Had enough yet?"

    I'm sorry that Obama couldn't wave his magic wand and make the damage from the disastrous eight Bush years go away overnight. It takes longer to rebuild a house than burn it down in the first place. The country is in a salvage operation from the previous administration....really the past 30 years of "trickle down economics".....and the hard Righties want to double down on the crazy of Reagan-Bush. It's going to take decades to undo their damage. Provided that no one with their political philosophy is allowed near the levers of power for a LONG time.

  22. Concerned Conservative
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    Concerned Conservative - November 28, 2011 12:27 pm
    How’s that hope and change working for you? Had enough yet?
  23. bladerunner
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    bladerunner - November 28, 2011 9:15 am
    I would exspect more of this from the left. 10% unemployment around the country and 60 minutes reporting on the 25% child poverty rate and families living in cars. Obama can hardly run for office using that.
  24. Artist1
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    Artist1 - November 27, 2011 10:27 pm
    Who is going to be responcible for the land after it is sucked dry and pumped full of chemicals. Watch the "landman" scurry then like rats in a fire. It doesn't sound like we are dealing with educated environmentalists. Someone better put a hold on this to find out exactly what chemicals they are using to improve the speed of extraction of the oil. This does not sound right, nor safe to the environment, nor our economy. Sounds sloppy and greedy to me.
  25. RockNDBakken
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    RockNDBakken - November 27, 2011 9:50 pm
    Mr. Helms and his staff have an enormous job ahead of them. Maybe they need more people in his department to stay pro-active and have tested and proven replacements on board to replace them during the 30 years ahead of this oil boom. It must be quite difficult to keep up with the ever changing rules of Obama and his EPA.
  26. Purple-Stater
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    Purple-Stater - November 27, 2011 9:42 pm
    So if I'm understanding this right, we have a strong "conservative" group here who favors disbanding the EPA completely so that we can get the oil, and the money that comes with it *NOW*. Never mind that we can easily make the western half of the state uninhabitable within 50 years in the process.

    Because government is bad and big corporate America will save us all.

    That about sum it up?
  27. Artist1
    Report Abuse
    Artist1 - November 27, 2011 7:30 pm
    citizen24 said: "Well, it would really serve us all right. We are trying to build a state economy on a commodity that left us high and dry in 1982. Albeit with a combination of help from government regulation and the oil industry itself. I guess I really hope that this "get rich quick" for us a citizens ( of which very few of us are getting rich) doesn't leave our state a wasteland after its all done.Maybe a closer look at the environmental ramifications makes sense. Or maybe some other agency that doesn't have the political baggage that the EPA does. But who would that be? I mean, do we just all nod our heads and accept what we are told by the people making money on this process that everything is alright? Are we not allowed to ask questions? "

    I agree with you. And when the wells run dry, what will happen to the land and the abuse of chemicals to make our land barren. It's called "raping the land". Even agriculture has CRP programs to give the land a "rest". This greed is going to kick us you know where and leave our land without natural nutrients.
  28. LoneStar
    Report Abuse
    LoneStar - November 27, 2011 7:17 pm
    So the only jobs are in the oil and gas fields? Oil and gas is it, huh? The EPA is not doing enough-playing politics instead of following it's mandate.
  29. citizen24
    Report Abuse
    citizen24 - November 27, 2011 4:48 pm
    Well, it would really serve us all right. We are trying to build a state economy on a commodity that left us high and dry in 1982. Albeit with a combination of help from government regulation and the oil industry itself.
    I guess I really hope that this "get rich quick" for us a citizens ( of which very few of us are getting rich) doesn't leave our state a wasteland after its all done.
    Maybe a closer look at the environmental ramifications makes sense. Or maybe some other agency that doesn't have the political baggage that the EPA does. But who would that be? I mean, do we just all nod our heads and accept what we are told by the people making money on this process that everything is alright? Are we not allowed to ask questions?
  30. Tomshere
    Report Abuse
    Tomshere - November 27, 2011 4:44 pm
    It looks to me as though Mr. Helms is going to roll over like a good boy for the Feds.

    If he's not willing to fight for the jobs and economy that any EPA action would ruin, he needs to be replaced.

    It's been proven over and over again, short of a few accidents in contained areas, that fracking is safe, is done far away from the water tables, and watched like a hawk by the drillers. They know that if they're not playing safe, there will be a crackdown.

    Also, from the rumors floating around and the likelihood of the "green zealots" who make up the Obama administration, from the top down, the EPA could well make a negative ruling before even their own research is concluded.
  31. Report Abuse
    - November 27, 2011 4:30 pm
    krten1966 said: "Thank you Bakken Watch. I do not see the need for fear of regulating those who are drilling into our North Dakota prairies. EPA would be a good outside regulator instead of in-state politicians who are only hoping to line their checkbooks. Hopefully with new regulations and improvements, our FUTURE generations will be able to thank us and say, in the words of Governor Art Link, "The land is as good and, in some cases, better than before.""

    If only our leaders were listening to you. Art Link and his generation are no longer in power. The current political climate is going to prevent the EPA from doing what the law intends for them to do. There is just too much money involved. Because this is an area in which we cannot count on our government to protect us, fracking will continue and someday, if there is truth in the allegations by those who allege they are suffering damages, it is going to be through class action lawsuits that justice will be done.
  32. Reality Check
    Report Abuse
    Reality Check - November 27, 2011 4:22 pm
    Scrappy2, you just made the case to re-elect Barack Obama President. None of what you say is true. If what you're spewing is how Obama's opponents think, then Obama is most certainly going to win again.
  33. krten1966
    Report Abuse
    krten1966 - November 27, 2011 2:18 pm
    Thank you Bakken Watch. I do not see the need for fear of regulating those who are drilling into our North Dakota prairies. EPA would be a good outside regulator instead of in-state politicians who are only hoping to line their checkbooks. Hopefully with new regulations and improvements, our FUTURE generations will be able to thank us and say, in the words of Governor Art Link, "The land is as good and, in some cases, better than before."
  34. BLanger
    Report Abuse
    BLanger - November 27, 2011 1:24 pm
    six figures in the patch... well, that means you bought into or almost bought into the Oil patch mutual funds being pushed.
    That stuff is much more volitile than what they say. and you believed the broker??? silly you... well, almost.
  35. take it or leave it
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    take it or leave it - November 27, 2011 12:22 pm
    I will take big oil over the United States Federal Government any day of the week. Lesser of two evils?
  36. joe blow
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    joe blow - November 27, 2011 10:37 am
    We have a surplus of oil. Why be in such a rush to capitalize on ND? Lets take our time and see if there is a problem with fracking. Usually when some one wants to do something in a rush theres a reason. We got time. That oil will be there for years to come and getting more valuable to the mineral holder everyday. It worries me that I have heard oil company excutives say. No other state is willing to work with oil companies like ND.
  37. patch
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    patch - November 27, 2011 10:15 am
    I was just getting ready to invest 6 figures in the oil patch..not going to now, I am going to keep my money in the bank
  38. ing1947
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    ing1947 - November 27, 2011 10:11 am
    I have no problem with EPA making sure that fracking is safe, however, come with unimpeachable proof that it is, not some mamby pamby it might be causing this or it might be causing that. Prove its polluting the environment and then fix it. No maybe its bad for us is enough. It either hurts people and the environment and we have solid proof it does, or it doesn't and the accusations of the fracking process are false.
  39. Hobson'sChoice
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    Hobson'sChoice - November 27, 2011 9:56 am
    Quiet frankly I know Lynn Helms and would not put any trust in anything he says.

    He speaks for the oil industry and only the oil industry.

    The key word in this headline and article is “could” not will.

    This is just another article and attempt to emasculate or cripple the Environmental Protection Agency.
  40. Humming
    Report Abuse
    Humming - November 27, 2011 9:50 am
    Slowing down the Bakken process would be a good thing, even a moratorium would be a sign that North Dakotans could do some serious thinking about what we really need when it comes to energy, development, jobs, environmental quality. Too many politicians and others have just allowed themselves to controlled by the force of big oil.
  41. SweeneyND
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    SweeneyND - November 27, 2011 8:38 am
    Hope and Change from the Obama administration and his EPA cronies. Think about it he is out to destroy carbon based energy. Shut down the Bakken, and he needs another year, (election) to research the Keystone pipeline that he has postponed. Might as well send to Tar Sands oil and the Bakken oil to China. This man is a hypocrite he preaches jobs, jobs, jobs, but yet wants to destroy tens of thousands of jobs. These two projects should not be delayed, this is about our global energy security and this President turns a blind eye.
  42. harpua
    Report Abuse
    harpua - November 27, 2011 2:40 am
    never trust anyone with a pin on their suit.
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