On a recent Saturday, there was a full schedule of college football games. Among the teams competing were the; Alcorn State University Braves, Catawba College Indians, Central Michigan Chippewas, Florida State Seminoles, Mississippi College Choctaws, University of Illinois Fighting Illini, University of Utah Utes and the University of North Dakota ...?

When the Florida State Seminoles host a game, a spear-wielding painted Indian, riding a painted horse, gallops into the opponent’s end zone and hurls the spear into the ground as an act of intimidation. And the 82,300 fans that pack their stadium all thunder in unison the sounds, and symbolize, the “tomahawk chop.”

Separate articles, written by Pilar Betts and Hayley Munguia, in August and September of 2015, reference in excess of 2,100 teams (professional, college, high school, and other) that are still using Native American mascots and imagery. What happened to the Sioux? University of North Dakota got bullied by the former president of the NCAA Myles Brand (deceased 2009) as he advanced a politically correct agenda and phrased “hostile and abusive.” The nickname that was originally selected in 1930, out of respect for the Sioux, and to offer a nickname worthy of challenging their main rival, the North Dakota State University Bison.

What has gone unexplained was how did so many other schools manage to dodge the mandate by Brand? Other schools concluded the NCAA is not the Supreme Court and said “no.” And now we are going to be forced to adopt some silly meaningless nickname which may well be one that we “pirate” from a local high school. And as his swan song, after having driven the final stake through the heart of 80 years of proud tradition, UND President Kelley will ride out of town to enjoy his retirement.

How shameful.

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