Mandan police patches

The Mandan Police Department unveiled two new patches to appear on the upper sleeves of its officers' uniforms. The bolder design will be reserved for dress uniforms.

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The Mandan Police Department unveiled two new patches to appear on the upper sleeves of its officers' uniforms.

The subdued patch will appear on everyday uniforms, with the bolder design reserved for dress uniforms to be worn at formal occasions, such as a funeral.

"It was brought to my attention that a lot of the police officers and leadership inside the police department wanted a new patch to represent the Mandan Police Department as authentic to Mandan," Chief Jason Ziegler said.

A committee led by Lt. Lori Flaten met several times over the past eight months to come up with a design that encompasses Mandan's heritage.

"The only guidelines I gave Lt. Flaten were I want the American flag on it, and I want 'where the west begins' on it, because I see it on all the street signs and I think that's kind of our heritage when you think about the city of Mandan," Ziegler said.

"When we started thinking about where the west begins and what is Mandan, we thought about cowboys, the rodeo. I mean, that's what people think of as Mandan," Flaten said.

The committee narrowed it down to three finalists, after a long process of cutting, pasting and coloring.

The winning logo features the American flag, a roping cowboy and various shades of red, white, blue and gold.

"It encompasses not only the rodeo, and our history with the rodeo, but our history with the west and the wild west," Flaten said. "And still continued ranching. It's all a big part of our history here."

The two patches will be phased in over the next several months as uniforms change.

"The officers, by and large, have just loved them," Flaten said. "They are also really happy about having two patches because who else does that? We wanted to be unique."

It was the early 1980s when the department updated its patch to the current Lewis and Clark design. Prior to that, the patch was adorned with an Indian head.

"I think it was time," Flaten said. "It's been a long time."

"I really like the patches. I think they're a nice change," said Mayor Tim Helbling. "It's always nice to see some change."

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General Assignment Reporter