Ratings by the Motion Picture Association of America are: (G) for general audiences; (PG) parental guidance urged because of material possibly unsuitable for children; (PG-13) parents are strongly cautioned to give guidance for attendance of children younger than 13; (R) restricted, younger than 17 admitted only with parent or adult guardian; (NC-17) no one 17 and younger admitted.

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(Critics’ Choices capsule reviews are by Kenneth Turan (K.Tu.), Justin Chang (J.C.) and other reviewers. Openings compiled by Kevin Crust.)

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OPENING IN HOLLYWOOD THIS WEEK

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“Acts of Vengeance” — The murders of his wife and daughter drive a high-powered lawyer to take a vow of silence and seek out the killer. With Antonio Banderas, Karl Urban, Paz Vega, Robert Forster, Johnathon Schaech. Written by Matt Venne. Directed by Isaac Florentine. (1:26) NR.

“Aida’s Secrets” — Two brothers separated as babies are reunited with their elderly mother after the discovery of records from World War II in this documentary. Featuring Izak Sagi, Shep Shell, Aida Zasadsina. Directed by Alon Schwarz. In English and Hebrew with English subtitles. (1:30) NR.

“Al Di Qua” — Italian documentary on homelessness in Turin. Directed by Corrado Franco. In Italian with English subtitles. (1:19) NR.

“All I See is You” — A blind woman gains her sight, drastically changing the dynamic of her relationship with her husband. With Blake Lively, Jason Clarke. Written by Sean Conway, Marc Forster. Directed by Forster. (1:50) R.

“AlphaGo” — A master of the 3,000-year-old Chinese game “Go” takes on artificial intelligence in this documentary that moves behind-the-scenes from Cambridge to Bordeaux, London and Seoul. Featuring Lee Sedol, Demis Hassabis, David Silver. Directed by Greg Kohs. (1:30) NR.

“Atomic Homefront” — Documentary follows a group of St. Louis-area activist mothers as they challenge government agencies over hazardous radioactive waste. It shines an urgent and devastating light on the lasting toxic effects that nuclear waste can have on communities. Directed by Rebecca Cammisa. (1:40) NR.

“Brimstone & Glory” — Documentary on the National Pyrotechnic Festival in Tultepec, Mexico. Directed by Viktor Jakovleski. In Spanish with English subtitles. (1:07) NR.

“Crash Pad” — An affair with an older, married woman goes wrong for a young slacker when the cuckolded husband decides to move in with him. With Domhnall Gleeson, Thomas Haden Church, Christina Applegate and Nina Dobrev. Written by Jeremy Catalino. Directed by Kevin Tent. (1:33) NR.

“Dealt” — Blind card magician Richard Turner is the subject of this documentary. Written by Luke Korem, Bradley Jackson. Directed by Korem. (1:25) NR.

“Flesh and Blood” — Mark Webber wrote, directed and stars as a man released from prison attempting to make amends with his broken Philadelphia family. With Madeline Brewer, Cheri Honkala, Guillermo Santos. (1:30) NR.

“God’s Own Country” — A lonely young Englishman working on his family’s farm is drawn to a good-looking migrant worker from Romania. With Josh O’Connor, Alec Secareanu, Gemma Jones, Ian Hart. Written and directed by Francis Lee. (1:44) NR.

“Halloween Pussy Trap Kill! Kill!” — An all-female rock band is lured into a vengeful madman’s house of horrors. With Sara Malakul Lane, Richard Grieco, Demetrius Staer. Written and directed by Jared Cohn. (1:26) NR.

“Inheritance” — A young American woman returns to Belize where she grew up to face the past with her new lover. With Jessica Kaye, Mark Webber, Daniel Ahearn. Written and directed by Laura E. Davis and Kaye. (1:15) NR.

“Jigsaw” — Ten years after the “Saw” killer supposedly died, police are faced with either a copycat killer or a murderous ghost. With Matt Passmore, Callum Keith Rennie, Cle Bennett, Hannah Emily Anderson, Laura Vandervoort, Mandela Van Peebles. Written by Josh Stolberg & Peter Goldfinger. Directed by the Spierig Brothers. (1:31) R.

“Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold” — Documentary profiles the prolific author, her work for Vogue in the 1950s and ‘60s, her novels, and long marriage to writer John Gregory Dunne. Featuring Vanessa Redgrave, Harrison Ford, Anna Wintour, David Hare. Directed by Didion’s nephew Griffin Dunne. (1:32) NR.

“Let There Be Light” — Kevin Sorbo directed and stars as a best-selling author and proponent of atheism whose views are radically changed after a serious car accident. With Sam Sorbo, Daniel Roebuck, Donielle Artese. Written by Dan Gordon, Sorbo. (1:40) PG-13.

“Liberation Day” — Documentary follows the ex-Yugoslavian cult band Laidbach as it becomes the first rock group to perform in North Korea. Featuring Boris Benko, Tomaz Cubej, Milan Fras. Written by Morten Traavik. Directed by Ugis Otte and Traavik. Written by Traavik. (1:40) NR.

“Mansfield 66/67” — Documentary combines interviews and archival materials with dance numbers, performance art and animation to tell the “true story based on rumor and hearsay” about the final years of actress Jayne Mansfield. Featuring Anton LaVey, John Waters, Mary Woronov, Tippi Hedren, Mamie Van Doren. Directed by P. David Ebersole and Todd Hughes. (1:25) NR.

“Maya Dardel” — An acerbic woman writer announces on NPR that she plans to kill herself and is searching for a male author to be her heir and executor. With Lena Olin, Alexander Koch, Nathan Keyes, Rosanna Arquette. Written and directed by Zachary Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak. (1:44) NR.

“Mully” — Documentary on Kenyan Charles Mully, who after being abandoned at the age of 6, grew up to be a successful businessman, then devoted his life to saving orphaned children. Directed by Scott Haze. (1:22) NR.

“Novitiate” — In the 1950s, a young woman discovers God through the Catholic Church and follows a path to serving him into the ‘60s. With Margaret Qualley, Melissa Leo, Julianne Nicholson, Dianna Agron, Morgan Saylor, Liana Liberato, Rebecca Dayan, Eline Powell, Chelsea Lopez, Denis O’Hare, Chris Zylka. Written and directed by Maggie Betts. (2:03) R.

“The Square” — An art installation designed to inspire altruism sets a high bar for a museum curator whose own behavior leaves something to be desired. With Claes Bang, Elisabeth Moss, Dominic West. Written and directed by Ruben Ostlund. In Swedish and English with English subtitles. (2:25) NR.

“Suburbicon” — The seemingly ideal appearances of a community in 1959 belie the dark world confronted by a family man. With Matt Damon, Julianne Moore, Noah Jupe, Oscar Isaac. Written by Joel Coen & Ethan Coen and George Clooney & Grant Heslov. Directed by Clooney. (1:44) R.

“Suck It Up” — Two friends hit the road to deal with their grief. With Grace Glowicki, Erin Margurite Carter. Written by Julia Hoff. Directed by Jordan Canning. (1:43) NR.

“Thank You for Your Service” — U.S. soldiers struggle with their lives after returning from active duty in Iraq. With Miles Teller, Haley Bennett, Joe Cole, Amy Schumer, Beulah Koale, Scott Haze. Written and directed by Jason Hall; based on the book by David Finkel. (1:48) R.

“The Truth About Lies” — A young man moves in with his mother and weaves a complicated mass of falsehoods to cover his downward spiral. With Odette Annable, Chris Diamantopoulos, Mary Elizabeth Ellis. Written and directed by Phil Allocco. (1:34) NR.

“The Work” — Three men engage in a four-day group therapy intensive with inmates at Folsom Prison in this documentary. Directed by Jairus McLeary. Co-directed by Gethin Aldous. (1:29) NR.

“Wexford Plaza” — A lonely female security guard’s life comes undone after an unexpected relationship with a bartender. With Reid Asselstine, Darrel Gamotin. Written and directed by Joyce Wong. (1:22) NR.

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CRITICS’ CHOICES

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“Battle of the Sexes” — This enjoyable and entertaining film, with the gifted and innately likable actors Emma Stone and Steve Carell as Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs, is most involving when it deals not with sports or society, but with the personal struggles both players, especially King, were going through in the run-up to their 1973 tennis match. (K.Tu.) PG-13.

“Blade Runner 2049” — You can quibble with aspects of it, but as shaped by Denis Villeneuve and his masterful creative team, this high-end sequel puts you firmly and unassailably in another world of its own devising, and that is no small thing. (K.Tu.) R.

“Dunkirk” — Both intimate and epic, as emotional as it is tension-filled, Christopher Nolan’s immersive World War II drama is being ballyhooed as a departure for the bravura filmmaker, but in truth the reason it succeeds so masterfully is that it is anything but. (K.Tu.) PG-13.

“Faces Places” — A participatory art project takes director Agnes Varda and photographer-artist JR on a tour of the French countryside in this wonderful documentary, which, like Varda’s other personal essays, becomes an exquisite trip down memory lane. (J.C.) PG.

“The Florida Project” — Absorbing us in the day-to-day rhythms of life at a dumpy Florida motel complex, home to a wildly spirited 6-year-old girl named Moonee (the startling Brooklynn Prince), Sean Baker (“Tangerine”) goes to a place few of us know and emerges with a masterpiece of empathy and imagination. (J.C.) R.

“Lucky” — As a small-town curmudgeon contemplating his own mortality, Harry Dean Stanton gives one of his final and greatest performances in this insistently low-key, dryly funny valentine to the actor’s life and career. (J.C.) NR.

“The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” — Funny, moving and psychologically complex, this is writer-director Noah Baumbach’s latest foray into the intricate paradoxes of dysfunctional family dynamics, and, starring Dustin Hoffman, Adam Sandler and Ben Stiller, it ranks with his best. (K.Tu.) NR.

“mother!” — Jennifer Lawrence plays the young wife of a poet (Javier Bardem) besieged by a number of unexpected visitors in this darkly exhilarating house-of-horrors thriller written and directed by Darren Aronofsky. (J.C.) R.

“Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton” — Even if surfing is not a major interest, Hamilton’s personal journey is extraordinary enough that we feel privileged to have such an intimate documentary glimpse into how it all went down. (K.Tu.) NR.

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©2017 Los Angeles Times

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